LIVE: BLINK 182 – CASTLEFIELD BOWL, MANCHESTER – 14/07/17 – #ThisIsTheLatest

LIVE: BLINK 182 – CASTLEFIELD BOWL, MANCHESTER – 14/07/17 0 174

In the wake of the Manchester Arena terror attack in May, many fans wondered whether US rockers Blink 182 would have to cancel their planned show in the city – their first for five years. Fortunately, for them – and to the delight of the thousands in attendance – they instead managed to find a new venue to play on the same night they were due on stage at the Arena. But before they played a single note, it was left to support acts The Front Bottoms and Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls to get the crowd warmed up…

New Jersey band The Front Bottoms, with their songs including “Twin Size Mattress” and “The Beers” were entertaining enough, largely because of the energetic melodies, but they are certainly some way off being ready for headline slots, particularly at a venue the size of the Bowl – not at all helped by having one of their members do nothing more than sit on a couch in the middle of the stage.

Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls fared much, much better, and the expletive-filled set of cracking tune after tune, beginning with “Get Better”, was just what the crowd needed to truly hype themselves up for the main event.

Taking a moment to address the fact that everyone was gathered at a new venue due to the horror and tragedy that unfolded back in May, before performing “The Next Storm” Turner said, to a deafening roar of support from the crowd:

“My heart fucking bled for Manchester on that day, but here’s the thing that we need to do. When someone tries to terrorise us out of what we do, we tell them to get fucked and we tell them we’re not going to stop…”

Calling a fan named Becky up on stage to play – or in her case, attempt to play – the harmonica during “Dan’s Song” provided a few minutes of light hearted humour, Frank’s diving into the crowd had fans in raptures and “Photosynthesis” had everyone – from those at the barrier, to the hundreds sat at the back, dancing with semi-reckless abandon. By the time he left the stage, there was no doubt Turner had delivered a set which was, in this reviewers’ mind at least, going to be hard to top.

Just as Blink 182 took the stage, in typical British summertime style, the heavens began to open but that didn’t dampen anyone’s spirits. It’s been two years since Matt Skiba, perhaps best known for being the front-man of Alkaline Trio, stepped into Tom DeLonge’s shoes, but in reality, you certainly couldn’t tell. Instead Skiba played and sang with as much passion as his predecessor had and, although it was left mostly to Mark Hoppus – bounding around with the energy of a man half his age – to engage with the crowd, he certainly fulfilled his share of the role when it came to entertaining the thousands who had come to see him, and them, play.

“Feeling This” and “The Rock Show” got things off to a strong start, while Barker, regarded as one of the greatest drummers of this era, proved his own worth as he powered his way through several numbers from the new album California including “Built This Pool” and “She’s Out Of Her Mind.”

As expected, “All The Small Things” went down a storm and a proposal being made in the first few rows of the crowd saw Hoppus call the couple up on stage, where he invited the guy to play bass. However for many, a real highlight of the bands’ set came right at the end when, as the trio began to make their off stage, Barker’s son Landon delivered a drum solo which would make the likes of Tre Cool and the late, great John Bonham proud.

With a hit-filled set that relied heavily on pyro which included fire and a ticket cannon, although Blink 182 were, and are, most certainly entertaining, the minimal amount of chat and real interaction with their audience – especially compared to Frank Turner – left some, this reviewer included, feeling like there was a palpable divide between band and the fans, and given the fact they’ve been going for 25 years – that alone made their performance tonight considerably disappointing.

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JANGO FLASH CHATS “PERSEID 45”, SOCIAL MEDIA & ULTIMATE AMBITIONS 0 103

With his “kamikaze pop” sound already having caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, Jack Angus Golightly, AKA Jango Flash, is slowly but surely making a name for himself, and his latest single “Perseid 45” is sure to have more music fans and critics alike talking. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Jango to talk song-writing inspiration and his big plans for the future.

watch TITL: Please introduce yourself if you would.

Jango Flash: Hi my names Jack, AKA “Tasty Daniels”, AKA “Ooo what’s in dem briefs”, AKA “Jango Flash”.

conocer mujeres celular TITL: Where did the name Jango Flash come from?

JF: It was two nicknames which I ended up gluing together. All of my close friends call me “Jango” because it kinda acts as an Abbreviation of (J)ack (An)gus (Go)lightly, and when I worked in a kitchen, I used to get called “Flash” because of how fast I could chop onions. I feel like every artist at some stage has made a list of “cool” sounding words to put together, like I did. But I ended up hating the process of deciding on something that felt concrete, because it was always so over analysed and contrived. I guess that’s why some people have went back to using online generators for sourcing a name without much thought, or just adding 5 more letters in or around a word. If you’re looking for a good name, it’s usually right on your doorstep.

follow site TITL: What would you say your artist unique selling point is?

JF: That’s a tricky one, I never really think about USP’s in music but I guess it would have to be my hands, apparently I’ve got lucky thumbs.

go TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by? What impact do they have on the music you make?

JF: Damn, that’s tough. Subconsciously I guess I’m inspired by early 2000’s music like t.A.T.u. because they came about at a really weird time in my life. I remember seeing the music video for “All The Things She Said” on Kerrang! and just feeling so many different emotions. They have this wonderful ability of being able to take darker, guitar driven music and then re-purpose it in a huge girl band style, it’s bad ass! I think there’s something to be said about their influences and how they decided to express that in their music. Death Grips are another group I love. From the get go, they’ve had an entire fan-base in the palm of their hands because they are masters at toying with peoples expectations. They’ve got a powerful presence on and off stage, and I can admire that they still do everything them selves, they are essentially modern day punks. Them Things is the band I play drums in, and I’m influenced by everything that we do together. Everyone in Them Things is full of fire and we’re all pretty free thinkers. We’ve fought badly with each other in the past and equally seen each other through a lot as friends, so I find it hard to imagine not being with those guys.

click TITL: Is there a story behind your latest single “Perseid 45” and is there an EP or album in the works?

JF: I’ll have a fully illustrated, four track E.P finished by the end of July time. I have a second single ready to release in June called “Deeper Thrill”, and two music videos in the works. The story behind “Perseid 45” came from a time when me and my partner took some duvets and deck chairs out into a field in Edinburgh and watched the Perseid meteor shower. I found it so strange to see that many in one night, it was pure magic. We had gone through a really rough time together when I wrote this song and I guess that was the first thing I thought about. It’s a blown out projection of extra terrestrial pondering, experiences shared and dark feelings of existentialism brought on by losing someone who you may have took for granted.

http://www.mongoliatravelguide.mn/?sakson=migliori-broker-opzioni-binarie&527=d8 TITL: When it comes to song-writing, where or how would you say you most find your inspiration?

JF: Inspiration usually strikes me at the worst times, it sucks. I’ll be on public transport with a melody rattling around my head and I’ll have to pull out my phone to record it, but somehow play down looking like a fruit loop by casually whistling to myself. Sometimes it’s circumstantial, like I woke up one morning and my partner was humming something, so I was like “what is that” and she went “oh, it’s chamber of reflection by Mac Demarco” and I say “nah it’s not, it sounds nothing like that”. I loved it so much that I ran downstairs to record it and it ended up being the guitar hook in “Perseid 45.” In terms of writing lyrics, I write a hell of a lot… like every day. When my first MacBook broke I lost around 600 notes full of stories, lyrics, poems and ideas. I just keep writing down my thoughts until I’ve struck something that makes me feel good, or accurately conveys a particular emotion. Other times I’ll highlight a phrase that sticks out to me in a sentence. Maybe the person talking is a character I can live through for a while, and they can be the ones writing. I try and pay attention to oddities that throw me off kilter.

app conocer gente nueva TITL: Which song, by another band or artist, do you wish you could have written, and why?

I’m sure I thought about this again last month, and it would probably be Carol King ‘s “Too Late.” Every time it comes on I just well up, because in it’s essence it’s so full of warmth and forgiveness, whilst ultimately saying “well I guess this is us then, bye”. It’s totally heart breaking in the best of ways, and it’s got to be one of my favourite songs in the world.

citas psicologicas gratis medellin TITL: Are there any tour or performance plans you can tell me about? 

JF: I don’t actually have a band together yet, it’s all just me at the minute. I have a few close friends on standby who are whole-heartedly ready to play with me should I be called for duty. Hopefully this year I can play my first show, but for now I want to create a body of work I can be proud of.

go here TITL: Which venue in the world would you most like to play and which four bands or artists, living or dead, would you like to share the bill with? 

JF: Jesus. I’m not really au fait with venues, I’ve never been a big dreamer on where it is I’d like to play, I’m always just happy playing live in general. I’ve always been more into dive bars though, they seem to have more character than academies etc which usually feel like glorified sports halls with overpriced drinks. If I were to choose though, it would have been CBGB’s when that was still around. I watched a documentary all about that place, it’s a great shame that somewhere with such colourful history got shut down. As for the acts – The Doors, Trash Talk, Timber Timbre and Babylon Zoo. I’m ready to hire in for parties.

dans la vie on rencontre des milliers de gens TITL: As someone who’s already caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, do you pay much attention to what the media says/writes about you, or are you more concerned with what your fans think? 

JF: I haven’t really had much written press until now with blogs starting to show interest in my work, plus my fans are still very much local at the moment. The thing I care about the most is how all of it is represented, I feel strongly about my work and it’s the only thing I really care about right now besides Them Things, my partner, my friends and my family. If those people are enjoying my music right now, I’m happy.

follow TITL: As a modern day artist in a technology obsessed world, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Have you found using social media to be a help or a hindrance when it comes to your career?

JF: I think on the DL I don’t like the fact that artists almost have to use social media if they want to be counted. At the same time though I don’t see it doing any harm because it’s helping people to connect with one another in creative ways. Not to sound all TED X about it, but I think we’re going to see a lot of expansion on the platforms we’re using, and that will bring in new and exciting ways to promote content, so that excites me. As much as I’d sometimes love to scrap social media, I’m still guilty of sitting up and scrolling through spicy ass memes. If you want to make money in today’s world, here’s a tip… create top quality original memes, watermark them and build an empire, THEN become a musician.

TITL: Finally then, what’s your ultimate goal? What would you like people to remember you for in terms of your music and what would you like your legacy to be? 

JF: I have far too many crazy goals, but I’m trying to take this project one step at a time. I’d love to have my own podcast, direct videos, produce music for film and TV and write my own screenplays. Right now though the wheels are in motion, I’m happy making my own music and seeing where it takes me, I just need to keep pushing myself out of my comfort zone.

Check out “Perseid 45” below and for more information on Jango Flash, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter. You can also see Jango Flash live on June 8th in Newcastle, as support for Ty Segal & The Freedom Band.

REVIEW: EMILY FAYE – ‘HERE I AM’ EP 0 66

Championed by Rolling Stone last year and named one of their ‘Ten New Country Artists You Need To Know’, Emily Faye’s passion for music stretches far beyond the short time she’s been in the spotlight as a star in her own right. Having gone from writing songs in her bedroom and studying at the British and Irish Modern Music Institute, she’s now released her debut EP called Here I Am.

Opening with “Open Road”, the collection gets off to a great and upbeat start, thanks to Faye’s soft, almost innocent vocal perfectly being perfectly paired with a toe-tapping country rhythm. “Giving In” is much slower, but maintains the EP’s focus on Faye’s vocal talents as she delivers the tracks’ strong, emotive lyrics that hold a a hint of defiance and rebellion in them.

“Game Over” is the kind of track that deserves to be played when listeners are taking a summer’s day drive with their friends. There’s an unmistakable ‘freedom and exploration’ vibe to the song – a perfect accompaniment to the upcoming summer break – that is sure to have the piece put on repeat.

Written about being comfortable with someone; a boyfriend, girlfriend, partner, or friend, who loves you for you, no matter what, there’s a reflective, deeply emotive and connective feel to closing number “Me For Me”, and as someone who has always struggled with self-confidence, the song reminded me that I have people in my life who wouldn’t and don’t want me to change who or how I am.

The EP as a whole has a very almost old-school, traditional feel to it, making it stand out from the many other releases of recent weeks and months that have focused more on the modern music styles which dominate the charts and the industry in general. The collection is a fantastic introduction to one of the hottest names in country music right now and will certainly have fans eager to see where Emily Faye goes and what she creates with her talent next.