PRISCILLA FORD TALKS ‘DEUX FACE’, SOCIAL MEDIA & THE FUTURE 140

With her new short film Deux Face having recently been accepted into the Toronto Film Festival which takes place in September, there’s no denying that 2017’s been and continues to be a great year for actress, model and blogger Priscilla Ford. A huge advocate of social media and currently working on a few of her own scripts, Ford spoke to ThisIsTheLatest about standing out in her fields, her famous family connection and embracing the future.

binary options millionaire TITL: You’re an actress, model and fashion blogger. Which of your career paths came first?

Priscilla Ford: My mother tried to get me involved in children’s modeling, but growing up I was more interested in watching plays like the Nutcracker and watching actors perform. I started blogging – or sharing my life with other’s online – in middle school.

http://agauchepourdevrai.fr/?fuier=rencontres-en-ligne-suisse&b99=ee TITL: Is there one you favour over another or are you just grateful to be able to do all the things you love?

PF: I am very grateful for everything I’m doing, especially for the life lesson’s that have been given to me in this the last year. I’ve learned everything happens on a steady gradient, it may not look like much to some, but life is a process, the building blocks for every career need to be in place before you can excel. If you spoke to me at 13 I would have said, “I’m failing, I want it all now!” I like the person I am growing into.

http://coleface.com.au/tag/coleface-print-management/page/2/?s= TITL: Blogging is a particularly difficult field to succeed in – how do you make your work stand out against your many competitors? Whose blogging style/writing do you admire?

PF: I can’t pin it down to just one. I recently went to a conference held by Nylon Magazine and Simply. I would say that my blogging much like life, is a personal journey-and in everyone’s personal journey there are those that we help and those that help us. I personally have taken away so much knowledge from my experience there that I’m re-aligning and re-imagining everything. I admire tons of bloggers and online writers; it just depends on what kind of support I am looking for.

click TITL: How did you get into modelling?

PF: From my mother’s attempts of getting me started in children’s modeling, I guess as I got older I started to fall in love with it.

conocer mujeres playa del carmen TITL: You’ve modelled for several indie clothing labels including Civil Regime. What is it about indie labels you’re so drawn to and is there any major fashion house you’d like to work for/with?

PF: Ah yes, indie is always good; it’s always authentic. Anyone will wear Marc Jacobs, it’s amazing! However, street-style has to be that, what you wear on your day to day in streets of your home city or your new stomping grounds.

http://www.creatingsparks.com/?endonezit=best-binary-options-automated-trading&52e=01 TITL: A lot of models get a lot of flak for appearing too skinny or promoting products and clothes that aren’t particularly targeted at every-day people. Have you ever found yourself facing criticism for the work you do?

PF: I’m very petite, from all angles. I can imagine it’s different for a girl who is 5’10 and 108 lbs –  it’s different than what people are used to seeing. To put it in lamented terms, no, no one has ever thrown shade at my body. I dig what I have going on, and I hope that others can like themselves enough to dig what they’ve got too.

http://www.youngasianescorts.co.uk/?baletos=%D9%86%D9%85%D9%88%D8%B0%D8%AC-%D8%AA%D9%82%D9%8A%D9%8A%D9%85-%D8%AE%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%B1-%D8%AB%D9%86%D8%A7%D8%A6%D9%8A&3e1=fc TITL: What can you tell me about your latest film, the avant-garde short Deux Face?

PF: It was so cool. The clothes were awesome and that time in my moment in my life was a very special time.

flirteo con mujeres TITL: What’s next for you in terms of acting? 

PF: Auditioning, auditioning, and of course creating something new. I’ve been writing a lot during 2017.

http://salsiando.com/finelit/1795 TITL: Which actors/actresses would you most like to work with and why?

PF: Oh man, so, so many people, jeez…but more importantly you can do a film with Marilyn Monroe but if the script, the director and producers are not in alignment it’s never going to be what it ought to be. I like to take it day by day.

http://pialadunia.es/?espikoleto=que-es-una-agencia-de-citas&39f=d1 TITL: Are there any other plans or projects in the pipeline you can tell me about?

PF: I am writing a few scripts, I have a writing partner, and then there are solo projects that I have been hammering out.

go to link TITL: How much attention do you get because of your family connections, notably being the cousin of Camila Alves/Matthew McConaughey?

PF: Some people who find out just think it’s cool, others have an agenda; it’s all a part of this revolving door city. Some people relate to me and we get closer because of the similar experiences…it always depends on the person.

http://agauchepourdevrai.fr/?fuier=homme-timide-cherche&08a=5c TITL: To what extent would you say the entertainment and media industries of which you’re a part of have changed over the years and how big of a part do you think social media has played? Are you a keen social media user or do you prefer to interact more personally with people?

PF: It’s so important to be on social media. Period. If you have been an indie actor your whole life, and then a top 10 agency signs you because you’re going to be in a franchise film, you have to think well-what if my popularity dies with the franchise? That shiny agency will drop you. How do you prevent that? Be awesome to the people that go and buy the tickets to see you and all of the other cool actors. Interact, be human even if it is on the internet. Human interaction is of course ideal, but I love being creative and reaching out to people that I might not get to meet in my own neighborhood. It’s so rad!

TITL: Finally, then, are there any career goals you’ve yet to achieve and what would you have to do in order to feel completely fulfilled?

PF: I’m not even getting started yet, I’m so excited and happy for the future. I love my path and understand it. I wasn’t a Disney Channel star at 12 years old, there was a different plan for me. I’m going to embrace that.

For more information and to keep up-to-date with Priscilla Ford, visit her website or follow her on Twitter. Header photo credit: Erin Marie Miller.

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JANGO FLASH CHATS “PERSEID 45”, SOCIAL MEDIA & ULTIMATE AMBITIONS 79

With his “kamikaze pop” sound already having caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, Jack Angus Golightly, AKA Jango Flash, is slowly but surely making a name for himself, and his latest single “Perseid 45” is sure to have more music fans and critics alike talking. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Jango to talk song-writing inspiration and his big plans for the future.

voltaren 40 mg 30-count TITL: Please introduce yourself if you would.

Jango Flash: Hi my names Jack, AKA “Tasty Daniels”, AKA “Ooo what’s in dem briefs”, AKA “Jango Flash”.

risperdal 50 mg iğne yan etkileri TITL: Where did the name Jango Flash come from?

JF: It was two nicknames which I ended up gluing together. All of my close friends call me “Jango” because it kinda acts as an Abbreviation of (J)ack (An)gus (Go)lightly, and when I worked in a kitchen, I used to get called “Flash” because of how fast I could chop onions. I feel like every artist at some stage has made a list of “cool” sounding words to put together, like I did. But I ended up hating the process of deciding on something that felt concrete, because it was always so over analysed and contrived. I guess that’s why some people have went back to using online generators for sourcing a name without much thought, or just adding 5 more letters in or around a word. If you’re looking for a good name, it’s usually right on your doorstep.

TITL: What would you say your artist unique selling point is?

JF: That’s a tricky one, I never really think about USP’s in music but I guess it would have to be my hands, apparently I’ve got lucky thumbs.

TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by? What impact do they have on the music you make?

JF: Damn, that’s tough. Subconsciously I guess I’m inspired by early 2000’s music like t.A.T.u. because they came about at a really weird time in my life. I remember seeing the music video for “All The Things She Said” on Kerrang! and just feeling so many different emotions. They have this wonderful ability of being able to take darker, guitar driven music and then re-purpose it in a huge girl band style, it’s bad ass! I think there’s something to be said about their influences and how they decided to express that in their music. Death Grips are another group I love. From the get go, they’ve had an entire fan-base in the palm of their hands because they are masters at toying with peoples expectations. They’ve got a powerful presence on and off stage, and I can admire that they still do everything them selves, they are essentially modern day punks. Them Things is the band I play drums in, and I’m influenced by everything that we do together. Everyone in Them Things is full of fire and we’re all pretty free thinkers. We’ve fought badly with each other in the past and equally seen each other through a lot as friends, so I find it hard to imagine not being with those guys.

TITL: Is there a story behind your latest single “Perseid 45” and is there an EP or album in the works?

JF: I’ll have a fully illustrated, four track E.P finished by the end of July time. I have a second single ready to release in June called “Deeper Thrill”, and two music videos in the works. The story behind “Perseid 45” came from a time when me and my partner took some duvets and deck chairs out into a field in Edinburgh and watched the Perseid meteor shower. I found it so strange to see that many in one night, it was pure magic. We had gone through a really rough time together when I wrote this song and I guess that was the first thing I thought about. It’s a blown out projection of extra terrestrial pondering, experiences shared and dark feelings of existentialism brought on by losing someone who you may have took for granted.

TITL: When it comes to song-writing, where or how would you say you most find your inspiration?

JF: Inspiration usually strikes me at the worst times, it sucks. I’ll be on public transport with a melody rattling around my head and I’ll have to pull out my phone to record it, but somehow play down looking like a fruit loop by casually whistling to myself. Sometimes it’s circumstantial, like I woke up one morning and my partner was humming something, so I was like “what is that” and she went “oh, it’s chamber of reflection by Mac Demarco” and I say “nah it’s not, it sounds nothing like that”. I loved it so much that I ran downstairs to record it and it ended up being the guitar hook in “Perseid 45.” In terms of writing lyrics, I write a hell of a lot… like every day. When my first MacBook broke I lost around 600 notes full of stories, lyrics, poems and ideas. I just keep writing down my thoughts until I’ve struck something that makes me feel good, or accurately conveys a particular emotion. Other times I’ll highlight a phrase that sticks out to me in a sentence. Maybe the person talking is a character I can live through for a while, and they can be the ones writing. I try and pay attention to oddities that throw me off kilter.

TITL: Which song, by another band or artist, do you wish you could have written, and why?

I’m sure I thought about this again last month, and it would probably be Carol King ‘s “Too Late.” Every time it comes on I just well up, because in it’s essence it’s so full of warmth and forgiveness, whilst ultimately saying “well I guess this is us then, bye”. It’s totally heart breaking in the best of ways, and it’s got to be one of my favourite songs in the world.

TITL: Are there any tour or performance plans you can tell me about? 

JF: I don’t actually have a band together yet, it’s all just me at the minute. I have a few close friends on standby who are whole-heartedly ready to play with me should I be called for duty. Hopefully this year I can play my first show, but for now I want to create a body of work I can be proud of.

TITL: Which venue in the world would you most like to play and which four bands or artists, living or dead, would you like to share the bill with? 

JF: Jesus. I’m not really au fait with venues, I’ve never been a big dreamer on where it is I’d like to play, I’m always just happy playing live in general. I’ve always been more into dive bars though, they seem to have more character than academies etc which usually feel like glorified sports halls with overpriced drinks. If I were to choose though, it would have been CBGB’s when that was still around. I watched a documentary all about that place, it’s a great shame that somewhere with such colourful history got shut down. As for the acts – The Doors, Trash Talk, Timber Timbre and Babylon Zoo. I’m ready to hire in for parties.

TITL: As someone who’s already caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, do you pay much attention to what the media says/writes about you, or are you more concerned with what your fans think? 

JF: I haven’t really had much written press until now with blogs starting to show interest in my work, plus my fans are still very much local at the moment. The thing I care about the most is how all of it is represented, I feel strongly about my work and it’s the only thing I really care about right now besides Them Things, my partner, my friends and my family. If those people are enjoying my music right now, I’m happy.

TITL: As a modern day artist in a technology obsessed world, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Have you found using social media to be a help or a hindrance when it comes to your career?

JF: I think on the DL I don’t like the fact that artists almost have to use social media if they want to be counted. At the same time though I don’t see it doing any harm because it’s helping people to connect with one another in creative ways. Not to sound all TED X about it, but I think we’re going to see a lot of expansion on the platforms we’re using, and that will bring in new and exciting ways to promote content, so that excites me. As much as I’d sometimes love to scrap social media, I’m still guilty of sitting up and scrolling through spicy ass memes. If you want to make money in today’s world, here’s a tip… create top quality original memes, watermark them and build an empire, THEN become a musician.

TITL: Finally then, what’s your ultimate goal? What would you like people to remember you for in terms of your music and what would you like your legacy to be? 

JF: I have far too many crazy goals, but I’m trying to take this project one step at a time. I’d love to have my own podcast, direct videos, produce music for film and TV and write my own screenplays. Right now though the wheels are in motion, I’m happy making my own music and seeing where it takes me, I just need to keep pushing myself out of my comfort zone.

Check out “Perseid 45” below and for more information on Jango Flash, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter. You can also see Jango Flash live on June 8th in Newcastle, as support for Ty Segal & The Freedom Band.

BISHAT TALKS NEW MUSIC, SOCIAL MEDIA & HER PLANS FOR WORLD DOMINATION 62

Having written her first song at the age of 13, music has been in Bishat’s blood for many years and now, following the release of her Q417 (Mixtape) EP, she’s ready and raring to share her passion for what she does with the world. She spoke to ThisIsTheLatest about the honesty and emotion behind her lyrics, her thoughts on social media and her plans to tour the world.

TITL: As an artist who comes from the same place as the legends that are ABBA, have you or do you ever feel any pressure to try and replicate their success or are you just happy to see that, over the years, more and more talented bands and artists from your country have graced stages around the world and won over music fans?

Bishat: I think it’s inspiring more than anything else, it just makes me feel like it’s possible to reach a global audience from this little corner of the world. The industry is so small in Sweden so you know a lot of the people making waves and it’s an amazing feeling when you’re in a taxi in New York or in a club in Ethiopia and there’s a global smash playing and you know the people who wrote it.

TITL: You wrote your first song aged just 13, with Jose Gonzalez. How would you say your writing style has changed and evolved since then and what advice would you give to anyone looking at writing their own first piece?

B: As with everything else, you mature and experience life and with that you evolve your way of thinking and how you’re expressing yourself. I’ve also had time to be influenced by a lot of other music and I’ve studied what others did to then land in something that is me. I think my music is much more raw and intuitive and a mash-up of all the genres that I’ve grown up listening to now.

TITL: You’ve so far been compared to the likes of Tove Lo and FKA Twigs, among others. Do you mind such comparisons or would you much rather be labelled an artist in your own right? 

B: Both Tove Lo & FKA Twigs are brilliant artists that I admire and am influenced by so I take that as a huge compliment. But yes, sometimes comparisons can be a bit lazy. People seem to crave the need of labeling and comparing and I get that in a time when there’s so much music it’s good to have some guidance and indication of other artists you might like. I’m really bad at explaining my sound and genre so if other people nail it then that’s all good. Of course I hope and think people see me an artist in my own right  – there’s room for everybody.

TITL: You’ve just released your debut EP Q417 (Mixtape). How was the creative, writing and recording process and is there one track/feature on the collection you’re particularly proud of?

B: This was a little different than I how I’ve worked before. I’ve always had a lot of sessions where we wrote lots of stuff over a long period of time but this was pretty much all done in the last quarter of 2017, hence the title. I was going through a lot of stuff, coming out of a long relationship, not having a place to live, so creating this EP became my mission, not to lose myself completely. I wrote all the songs myself except  “Unholy Romance” which I wrote with XOV, and then involved a few trusted people in the production process to help me finish it so it feels even more personal with the entire core coming from me. I’m most proud of “Give You Up” because it’s the first track I produced all by myself, even though I’m always involved and co-produce all my stuff. I have, as a female, struggled with daring to call myself a producer but now I feel that I truly can and no one can tell me nothing and that feels good. It’s also the rawest song I think I’ve ever written and listening to it reminds me of how broken I was at the time. It’s a bit painful but it also feels like the whole reason I even got into music in the first place. To create things that are raw and vulnerable that hopefully resonate with others going through the same things.

TITL: Now that the EP’s out, have you started thinking about writing again for the follow-up or are you just going to go with the flow and see what the response to this EP is like first?

B: Yes, I have some songs written but I haven’t entirely set the tone for the next EP, or maybe album, just yet. I’m going to London for a while to do some writing – the music scene there is really inspiring at the moment with so much great music coming out, so maybe that will shape the sound. But, I will definitely try to put out more music after summer.

TITL: The EP as a whole is rather dark and addresses a considerably difficult time in your life. Were you ever apprehensive about sharing those times with the world through your music as you have, or is it something you’d like to see more artists do – address real issues in their lives and those of others?

B: I personally love music that I feel is super honest. I mean it doesn’t even have to be real life, but some artists make you feel like it is anyway. Life is messy and hard and incredible and that’s nothing to be ashamed of. I think everyone would be better off if we were more open and honest about the struggles, depression or whatever it is that we go through. There was a point when we were mixing and I was like ​‘wow this feels pretty exposing’, but at that point I wasn’t gonna throw it all away. It was a little scary but I’m proud of my work and proud that I managed to put it together even though I was such a mess.

TITL: You’ve also dropped the video for “Dream About Me.” How did you come up with the concept, and how hands on in terms of the creative process, do you like to get when it comes to making videos and such?

B: Post break up analysis I guess triggered it. I was like I’ve been in these long relationships but in the end I somehow mess them up. They may not have been the right ones for me but still…I started to see patterns in my behavior and in everyone’s really. Most of us repeat the same mistakes over and over and so I had this idea of showing several relationships, which in the end ended up being just two, where you are super intense and all in in the beginning but then grow restless and end up leaving and then repeat it with someone else. The fear of space and change – which ironically is the thing that usually ends up ruining it. I’m very involved in every aspect of my artistry. I do almost everything by myself from artwork to styling and I was very involved in the video so it’s all very much me which is really nice even though it gets crazy stressful at times. The anxiety is real.

TITL: Personally and professionally, are you much of a social media user and how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and YouTube can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current?

B: I use social media a lot but not a crazy amount. I understand that it’s important and it’s really cool to have that instant way of connecting with people. To be able to chat to someone who loves my song in Peru in my Insta DMs is amazing. However, the flip side is the fact that there’s such power in numbers – I think we are too fixated with  followers, likes and streams and that it influences what we think of the artist before we’ve​ even heard the music. I wonder if you’d listen to the same stuff or talk about the same artists if you couldn’t see streams on Spotify or didn’t have YouTube views showing.

TITL: Finally then, with the video and EP out now, what’s next for you? What does the rest of the year have in store for you, and have you started looking further ahead as to what the more distant future could and might hold for you?

B: I’m gonna play some shows which I’m really excited about, write lots of music for myself and other artists and slowly work on that world domination stuff. I’m ready for that world tour.

Check out the video for “Dream About Me” below and for more information on Bishat, give her page a like on Facebook or follow her on Twitter. Her Q417 (Mixtape) EP is available now.