ALL THE LATEST FROM THE LAS VEGAS SHOOTING AS TRIBUTES POUR IN 175

Police are working to establish the motive behind a mass shooting which left at least 59 dead and another 527 injured at a Las Vegas concert.

Gunman Stephen Paddock, 64, opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel towards an open-air music festival on Sunday evening.

Police found 23 guns in his hotel room, as well as “in excess of” 19 firearms and explosives at his Nevada home.

But as yet, no clear reason for the killing has emerged.

Investigators have found no link to international terrorism, despite a claim from so-called Islamic State. Some investigators have suggested psychological issues, but there is no confirmation of this.

The shooter was not known to police.

President Donald Trump described the attack as “pure evil” in an address from the White House on Monday.

Stephen Paddock lived in a community of senior citizens in the small town of Mesquite, north-east of Las Vegas.

He reportedly lived with a woman called Marilou Danley who is out of the country in Japan, and does not appear to be involved, police said.

Las Vegas Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said when police searched the property after the attack they found 19 “additional firearms, some explosives and several thousand rounds of ammo, along with some electronic devices we’re evaluating at this point”.

Officers also found ammonium nitrate in Paddock’s car. The explosive found in his home was tannerite, the sheriff said.

There is a second house in northern Nevada which Swat teams are due to check for booby-traps before carrying out a search , Sheriff Lombardo said.

David Famiglietti of the New Frontier Armory told the BBC that Paddock had purchased firearms at his store in North Las Vegas in the spring of this year, meeting all state and federal requirements, including an FBI background check.

However, the shotgun and rifle Paddock bought would not have been “capable of what we’ve seen and heard in the video without modification,” Mr Famiglietti said.

Despite the large cache of weapons in his home, his brother, Eric, is dumbfounded that he acted this way.

Las Vegas Sheriff Joe Lombardo described the shooting as a “lone wolf” attack.

So-called Islamic State (IS) has claimed to be behind the attack, saying Paddock had converted to Islam some months ago.

But the group provided no evidence for this and has made unsubstantiated claims in the past.

The FBI said it had found “no connection to an international terrorist organisation”.

IS’s claim of responsibility for the Las Vegas attack is very unusual in that the perpetrator’s profile does not fit that of supporters or “soldiers” that the group has claimed in the past, writes Mina al-Lami, who monitors jihadist groups for the BBC.

The final shows of the three-day Route 91 country music festival were in full swing when the gunman struck.

According to police, Paddock had booked into the hotel four days earlier, on 28 September, reportedly using some of Ms Danley’s identity documents.

Sheriff Lombardo said there were 10 suitcases in the suite, which had two rooms.

Thousands were enjoying a performance by top-billing singer Jason Aldean when the first of several bursts of automatic gunfire rang out – hundreds of shots, witnesses say. That was late on Sunday night – 22:08 local time (05:08 GMT on Monday).

Hundreds of concert-goers scrambled for cover, flattening themselves against the ground, rushing for the exits or helping others to escape as Paddock sprayed the site from his high vantage point.

It is thought he moved between two windows in his suite as he carried out the attack.

“One man had blood all over him and that’s when I knew something was seriously wrong,” Mike Thompson from London, told the BBC.

“People were running and there was chaos.”

Many hotels on the Las Vegas strip close to the scene were placed on police lockdown and parts of Las Vegas Boulevard were shut.

The authorities have yet to confirm the identities of any of the 58 killed.
Jordan McIldoon, 23, from British Columbia in Canada, has been identified as a victim of the attack by CBC News.

A nurse, Sonny Melton, of Big Sandy, Tennessee, has been named as another victim by The Jackson Sun newspaper.

In a Facebook post, his wife, Dr Heather Gulish Melton, said she “lost my true love and knight in shining armor. I appreciate the prayers but I just need some time.”

An off-duty Las Vegas police officer was another of those who died.

Nevada has some of the least stringent gun laws in the United States.

People are allowed to carry weapons and do not have to register themselves as a gun-owner.

Background checks are done when people buy guns, but they are also allowed to sell them privately.

Former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, who survived a shooting six years ago, called for political leaders in Washington to introduce tougher gun laws following the Las Vegas attack.

Her husband Mark Kelly read out a joint statement on the steps of the Capitol saying thoughts and prayers from the White House were not enough to stop the next shooting.

Tributes have also been pouring in from across the globe.

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JAMES CORDEN TO BRING LATE LATE SHOW TO LONDON NEXT MONTH 35

The Emmy® award-winning The Late Late Show with James Corden will return to London to broadcast four special episodes from the historic Central Hall Westminster, from Tuesday 19 June to Friday 22 June 2018, to air exclusively on Sky One and TV streaming service NOW TV in the UK.

Corden will host a star-studded lineup for the show’s second UK adventure, including Cher, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom, Niall Horan and Foo Fighters, with additional guests to be announced.

The episodes, produced by CBS Productions and Fulwell 73, will air in the US on the CBS Television Network and share highlights of James’s time in the UK. The Late Late Show’s signature musical and comedy segments, such as Crosswalk: The Musical and Take a Break, will be given a British twist.

Ben Winston, executive producer of The Late Late Show with James Corden, said: “Broadcasting The Late Late Show from James’s hometown of London last year was such a thrill. Thanks to CBS and our partners at Sky One, we are back for a second year. We are looking forward to a fun week in London, putting a UK spin on our nightly show.”

Philip Edgar-Jones, head of entertainment at Sky, said: “James Corden is one of Sky One’s brightest stars and we are delighted to welcome him home for his London recordings of The Late Late Show. And with such a stellar lineup of guests, it’s going to make British summer time even hotter.”

Sky One will broadcast the homegrown episodes from 19-22 June at 10.00pm, and they will also be available on TV streaming service NOW TV.

James has been a firm favourite on Sky One and NOW TV for a number of years, presenting A League of Their Own and appearing in two successful series of A League of Their Own: US Road Trip.

The Late Late Show with James Cordon is available daily via Sky’s on demand service and NOW TV. The show regularly features a mix of celebrity guests, musical acts, games and sketches. The show holds the YouTube record for the most-watched late-night clip with Adele Carpool Karaoke, which has more than 180 million views. The Late Late Show with James Corden airs weeknights on CBS. Ben Winston and Rob Crabbe are the executive producers.

ITV TO AIR WHO WANTS TO BE A MILLIONAIRE 20TH ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS NEXT WEEK 56

To mark the 20th anniversary of the global hit game show, Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?, the iconic programme will return to ITV for a week of celebratory episodes, starting this Saturday. Airing as a stripped event across the week, the 7×60 minute episodes will play out every night and will be hosted by brand new presenter, Jeremy Clarkson.

The show will offer members of the public the chance to win £1,000,000. Each contestant will have the opportunity to answer 15 questions on their way to hopefully winning this life changing prize.

The contestants will be helped along the way by familiar lifelines of ‘Ask The Audience’, ‘Phone a Friend’ and ’50:50’, plus a brand new fourth lifeline; ‘Ask The Host’.

This brand new, additional lifeline allows the contestant to ‘Ask The Host’ if he [Jeremy Clarkson] knows the answer or if he has an opinion on what it might be. Jeremy never sees the questions ahead of the contestants so there is no guarantee he will know the answer. Will Jeremy be able to help someone along the way to winning one million pounds or will it cost them everything?

In another twist, contestants will be able to set their own second safety net amount. There is a fixed safety net at £1,000, meaning once a contestant has successfully answered Question 5 and won £1,000, that’s the minimum they will take home.

Traditionally, the second safety net was automatically set at £32,000. However, in these seven celebratory episodes, this new twist will allow the second safety net to be set by each contestant. Once they have banked £1,000, they will be given the opportunity to set their safety net ahead of the next question being asked. They can set their safety net only once and anywhere from £2,000 to £500,000. Will contestants be brave enough to risk losing big money in the hope to go all the way?

Jeremy Clarkson said “If the contestant chooses that lifeline [Ask The Host], they get to ask me if I know the answer. God help them. Anyone who doesn’t win £1,000,000 is bound, at some point, to ask me if I know the answer. And if it’s 1970’s prog rock music, I probably will. If it’s anything other than that, I probably won’t.”

On talking about the safety net changes, Jeremy Clarkson added “They can choose where it goes. So they choose how much they are going to lose at any given moment, which is a very clever idea. That requires balls of steel. To go beyond, say £32,000, when you’re going to drop back to £1,000 if you get it wrong. To say, ‘no I’ll set it at £64,000 and risk losing £63,000 if I get it wrong’, balls of steel.”

The series will be produced by Stellify Media with filming taking place in Manchester. Commissioned for ITV by Siobhan Greene, Head of Entertainment, with Ben Kelly Commissioning Editor, it will be executive produced by Fiona Clark and Stellify’s joint managing directors Kieran Doherty and Matthew Worthy, with Julia Knowles as Director. Who Wants To Be A Millionaire is a Sony Pictures Television format.

Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? starts Saturday 5th May at 9.15pm on ITV and continues nightly thorough-out the week at 9pm

More Details on All The Format of The Show:
In each episode, six different contestants will play ‘fastest finger first’ for the chance to win a place in the coveted chair and play the game. If a game concludes with one contestant, the remaining contestants will play ‘fastest finger first’ again for another opportunity to play for one million pounds.

Each contestant can see the question, answers, use their lifelines and still choose not to play the question and walk away with any money they have banked. The host is never shown the answer in advance of the contestant deciding to play the question and locking in their answer by saying ‘Final Answer’. The host does not have an earpiece or have any way to find out the answer.

Fastest finger first
The host will read out a question and four answers. Contestants will need to put the answers in the correct order. Fastest finger first questions are timed and the contestant who answers correctly in the fastest time, wins a place in the chair to play for one million pounds.

The contestants will face 15 questions for the chance to win one million pounds. Money will increase in the following increments:

Question 1 – £100
Question 2 – £200
Question 3 – £300
Question 4 – £500
Question 5 – £1,000
Question 6 – £2,000
Question 7 – £4,000
Question 8 – £8,000
Question 9 – £16,000
Question 10 – £32,000
Question 11 – £64,000
Question 12 – £125,000
Question 13 – £250,000
Question 14 – £500,000
Question 15 – £1,000,000

Safety Nets
There is a fixed safety net at £1,000. This means that once a contestant has answered the £1,000 question correctly, this is the minimum they will take home. Traditionally, the second safety net was automatically set at £32,000.

However, in these seven celebratory episodes, a new twist will allow the second safety net to be set by each contestant in play. Once they have successfully answered Question 5 and won £1,000, they will be given the opportunity to set their safety net ahead of the next question being asked. They can set their safety net anywhere from £2,000 to £500,000. The can only set this once during their game and until they set their second safety net, they will be asked ahead of seeing the next question. If they choose to set their safety net at the next question, they must correctly answer that question for it to be set and be in play. For example; A contestant has successfully answered Question 10 and won £32,000, they could then be asked if they want to set their safety net at £64,000. If they say yes, they will then see the question, four possible answers and can decide if they want to play. If they play and correctly answer the question, the minimum they will go home with is £64,000. They can continue the game and their safety net will remain at £64,000. This cannot be moved or reset. If they answer the question incorrectly, they will lose £31,000 and leave with £1,000.

Four lifelines are available to all contestants to use once at any point in their game, one more than was traditionally available.

The four lifelines available to each contestant in the chair are:

50/50
Contestants can choose to use this lifeline to remove two random wrong answers, leaving one correct answer and one random wrong answer. Even after they have used this lifeline, the contestant can still choose to not answer the question and take the money that they have currently banked.

Ask The Audience
If a contestant decides to use this lifeline, the host will read the question and all possible answers. The host will ask the audience to vote for the answer they think is correct via an electronic keypad within an allotted time. The audience will not have access to any device where they could find out the answer from a third party or Internet. The contestant does not need to take the advice given nor continue playing the game. The contestant can still choose to take the money they have currently banked.

Phone A Friend
If the contestant wants to contact a friend, the host will lead the call and explain to the chosen friend that the contestant needs assistance on a question. Once the host hands the call over, the contestant will have 30 seconds to read the question, possible answers and have any discussions. The ‘friend’ will not see the countdown clock. The contestant does not need to take the advice given nor continue playing the game. They can still choose to take the money they have currently banked.

Prior to arriving to set, each contestant will be asked to select two ‘phone a friends’ and give their details. On the day that each contestant is set to play the game (six contestants per episode), Production will send an independent security team to all phone a friend residents in that episode. Once a contestant plays fastest finger first and wins a place in the chair, the security team will enter both of the ‘phone a friends’ residents. This is to ensure that if and when phoned, the friend does not source outside help to answer the question. Once the contestant has finished their game or used their lifeline, security will leave.

Ask The Host
This is a brand new, additional lifeline available once to all contestants. This lifeline allows the contestant to ‘Ask The Host’ if he [Jeremy Clarkson] knows the answer or if he has an opinion on what it might be. The host can give his opinion, answer or share his thoughts but there is no guarantee he will know the answer. Once he has shared his thoughts / given as much as he can, he will say ‘That’s my final answer’ which signifies the end of his assistance and the contestant can not ask the host any more questions. The host is never shown the answers in advance of the contestant saying this is my ‘Final Answer’. The contestant does not need to take the advice given nor continue playing the game and can still choose to take any money they have currently banked. If the contestant does decide to play, the contestant will select the answer and say ‘final answer’. Once the answer is locked in, the contestant and host will have the answer revealed at the same time.