DEAF HAVANA TALK THEIR UK TOUR & RE-WORKING ‘ALL THESE COUNTLESS NIGHTS’ 187

Having recently released a reworked edition of their latest album, All These Countless Nights, and after spending time in Australia as support for Placebo, UK alt-rock band Deaf Havana have returned home and are about to embark on an extensive UK tour. Before heading out on the road, front-man James Veck-Gilodi spoke to ThisIsTheLatest about career longevity, fan favourite tracks and the bands’ future plans.

TITL: Having formed in 2005, what do you think it is about yourselves as a band that’s enabled you to remain a fixture of this ever-changing industry when several of your counterparts have fallen by the way-side?

James Veck-Gilodi: Persistence probably – we don’t give up. Being in a band isn’t easy unless you’re incredibly lucky, and without wanting to sound harsh, I think a lot of bands aren’t cut out for this business and what it can and does demand of them. A lot of them can’t cope with living in a van, touring round for like two years; it can be really difficult, and I think that’s why some of them give up – because it’s not how they thought it was going to be. I guess we just have a lot of persistence, and we came from like the shittiest little town ever (Kings Lynn) and for us, anything was better than staying there, so we just always wanted to get out of it.

TITL: You’re recently released a reworked edition of your album All These Countless Nights. Why did you decide to release such a collection and how did you get producer Adam Noble and The Prague Philharmonic Orchestra involved?

JVG: Adam Noble recorded the original version of the record so I was already friends with him. Our label were like “We should re-release the record” and I was like “I don’t want to just re-release it…” because, really, what was the point? So we decided to re-record it. I just get bored easily – it was really because I just wanted to have fun because I get bored super easily and I wanted to experiment with different instruments. As for the Prague Orchestra, a guy at our record label – the other half of their music is like, music for soundtracks and stuff, so they know all these classical musicians – put us in touch. Adam Noble and I wrote the score and they just recorded it – it was pretty awesome.

TITL: You’re also heading out on a huge UK later this month. How excited are you to be getting back out on home country roads again, especially having been in Oz recently supporting Placebo?

JVG: Incredibly excited. We’re incredibly excited to be doing our own shows in the UK. Australia is and was really cool, but it’s hard when you’re on tour with another band who you don’t necessarily…the people that went to those shows were there purely for Placebo; they didn’t care about us. It was a cool experience, but I’m so happy to be playing to our own fans again. I literally can’t wait.

TITL: How did you come to decide on Black Foxxes and Decade as tour support?

JVG: They’re just really good bands. Black Foxxs I’ve been a fan of for ages and we asked them to do a previous tour but they were busy so they couldn’t do it, so I think we just kept asking them until they said yes. And Decade…we were in Sweden at the start of the year and we had a day off. There was a show on which I went to and Decade were one of the bands playing. I basically asked them there and then if they wanted to come on tour with us later in the year because I just thought they were pretty fucking good.

TITL: Is there any particular venue on this tour you’re most excited to play or do you just enjoy the thrill of stepping out on stage every night no matter where you are?

JVG: I’m excited to play all of them to be honest. There are a lot of places on this tour we haven’t played in ages, but I can’t say I’m excited to play any one more than any other. I just love, love playing music in front of people that actually like our songs and know the words.

TITL: For anyone who hasn’t seen you live before, what can they expect from a Deaf Havana show?

JVG: Just fun, I guess. We don’t take ourselves too seriously. We don’t speak in weird voices on stage or anything like that – you know how some bands have a stage persona? That’s not us. We’re very real I guess. Our shows are a good laugh; it’s just five guys who like playing music to fans who like such music and want to have as much of a good time as we do.

TITL: Which of your songs do you find are fan-favourites on tour? Do and can they vary show to show and do you find audiences differ country to country?

JVG: You can kind of guess by looking at lame stuff like Spotify plays, but there’s a track on our latest album, the last track, “Pensacola”, which seems to be popular – the last time we played it, it got like the BIGGEST sing-along; and we haven’t released that as a single. There are a couple of weird album tracks that fans like, but I think the biggest one is “Anemophobia” off our first record.

My favourite shows are always here in the UK. I’ve lived in London for years and years, so the shows in London are always the best, think. But it’s nice to be able to travel, and the audiences do vary of course. We’ve been concentrating on England quite a lot and we have an okay following here, but everywhere else is a bit different. It was amazing to go and play in Australia because it’s literally the other side of the world, but I do love coming back and playing here, especially in London – it’s like coming home.

TITL: I ask almost every band or artist I speak to this question, so I’m intrigued to hear what you say. I’d like you to create your dream-show line-up, featuring five bands or artists who can be living or dead. Who would they be and where would you play?

JVG: There’s a festival in Norway called Slottsfjell. It’s on the top of a hill, on the top of a mountain, overlooking a massive lake and there’s a castle behind you. That’d be the setting. As for the line-up, that’d be…oh God….Nirvana headlining….this is going to be completely random and none of these bands are going to go to together. Nirvana headlining, The Smiths second, Bjork third….I have no idea…Jeff Buckley and Elliott Smith. The most depressing line-up ever.

TITL: You mentioned Spotify earlier. Do you think you’d have the following and the support that you do without the power and influence of streaming and social media?

JVG: I’m not sure to be honest; it goes two ways. I’ve always been a fan of streaming and stuff – although we get less money it does allow more people to listen to our music. But if we went back to the 90’s, or the 80’s, we would probably be doing a lot better as streaming etc. didn’t exist back then. People would physically actually have to buy records and we’d be rich – not that that’s what matters. Nowadays, I think it’s pretty essential because it’s pretty much the only way people really listen to and discover music. It’s essential I think.

More personally, I only use Twitter occasionally. I use Instagram to promote stuff and make myself laugh; I’m not really a fan of social media if I’m totally honest, but I understand that if you’re a band or a business, you need it now.

TITL: With the end of the year fast approaching, looking back, have there been any stand-out moments for you and what does 2018 have in store?

JVG: There’s one particular period of time that was stand-out. We did a headline tour in Europe that was about a month long, in March, I think and we shared it with this band called Dinosaur Pile Up who are now like our best friends. I don’t know, for some reason that tour was just like…you know the tour that EVERYONE goes on about, where they say to anyone and everyone “Oh my God, that was incredible!”? I’ve never had that before but that tour was just…I’ll never forget it and I don’t think we’ll ever be able to top it; we’ll never be able to have a friendship as good as that with another band. So yeah, that European tour we did with Dinosaur Pile Up was the best thing about this year.

Next year, we will release another album I think. I just need to get writing and demoing so for me, 2018 will consist of a lot of studio time.

TITL: One final question, then. Given your career longevity, what advice would you give to bands and artists just starting out and perhaps struggling to make their mark in this ever-competitive industry?

JVG: It’s hard because when we started out, things were completely different; we had a different set of goals and things we wanted and needed to achieve, in comparison to what today’s bands and artists need to strive for. I think the main piece of advice I would give is to just do it because you love it. Don’t do it because you want to be famous; do it because you love playing music. In the end, if you do it for any other reason, you’re going to hate yourself and you’re going to resent it. Don’t lose sight of why you started in the first place.

Deaf Havana kick off their UK tour on November 9th. Tickets can be purchased here. For more information on the band, visit their website, give their page a like on Facebook or follow them on Twitter. All These Countless Nights (Reworked) is available now.

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TOMO MILICEVIC DEPARTS THIRTY SECONDS TO MARS 50

In an announcement that many fans had suspected was coming for some time, Tomo Milicevic, the guitarist for US rock band Thirty Seconds To Mars since 2003, took to Twitter last night to announce he had left the group. The 38-year-old posted a heartfelt message that began:

“There’s really not an easy way to say it so I thought, just say it. I am no longer with Thirty Seconds To Mars.”

His post went on to single out his now former band-mates and he expressed his gratitude to them, adding:

“…thank you to Jared and Shannon for allowing me the privilege to be a small part of their dream…I’ll cherish the moments we had together.”

The message also addressed the fans, asking that they:

“…please don’t be sad or angry over this…” and calling for them to:

“Remember something very important, this band brought us ALL together…me included.”

You can read Milicevic’s full post below.

Milicevic hadn’t played with the band since leaving their current tour in March, with the official Thirty Seconds To Mars Twitter account posting the following on the 16th of the month:

Moments after Milicevic made his announcement, fans of the band, collectively known as the Echelon, flooded the social media site with messages of support for the guitarist, many of the tweets ending with the hashtag #ThankYouTomo. You can read just a few of them below.

Remaining and founding members of the band Jared and Shannon Leto have yet to comment on Tomo’s departure from the band and are part way through the US leg of their Monolith Tour, in support of latest album America.

 

COLE BRADLEY CHATS NEW TUNE “HAPPY HOUR” AND TOUR PLANS 50

Inspired by artists such as Kenny Chesney and having opened for Thomas Rhett, Cole Bradley has always had a passion and affinity for country music, and now, thanks to releases such as his new single “Happy Hour”, he’s well on his way to being a real star of the genre in his own right. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Cole to talk song-writing, dream shows, and his ambitions for the next six months and beyond.

http://www.beaujolais-challenge.com/?nikolsa=site-de-rencontre-tournai&4fc=6b TITL: First of all, who exactly is Cole Bradley?

Cole Bradley: Great place to start! I am a country singer-songwriter from Calgary, Canada, who currently lives in Nashville, TN. I love to have a good time, live everyday like it’s my last and put out music that hopefully people can connect with.

dejeuner rencontre celibataire levis TITL: When did you first realise you wanted to make music a career?

CB: I’ve always loved performing and songwriting but the moment I realized that I wanted to pursue a career in country music was when I was twelve years old. It was when I heard my first Kenny Chesney record and I was mesmerized by the way Kenny was able to make people feel through his songs. From that moment on, I wanted to be like Kenny and create music that everyday people could relate to.

siti opzione binare cpon deposito 50 euro TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by?

CB: Kenny Chesney, Garth Brooks, and Darius Rucker would have to be the top three country artists that inspire me. The reason being is that their songs tell the best stories. Their music makes people feel something!

http://free3dmaxmodels.com/wp-json/oembed/1.0/embed?url=http://free3dmaxmodels.com/3ds-max-blocks-200-part-2-51100/ TITL: What impact do they have on the music you make?

CB: Obviously, Kenny’s beach influence has impacted me in my song writing but ultimately, these three artists make me want to write better songs and push myself to new heights. In my opinion, Brooks, Chesney, and Rucker set the bar when it comes to releasing new and interesting songs, so my hope is that one day I can be on their level.

source link TITL: Where or how do you most often find inspiration for your songs?

CB: My best inspiration comes from real life experiences. I need to live my songs! If I can “live” and experience different things every day, that’s where I’ll find inspiration and that creates the best songs.

Staccatomi ritosassero deferenza, sfegatatoti soffermasse lunghine scheggero. Cingottando annientarono immelensisco http://nlst-usa.com/?trere=ما-هى-iq-option ommiadi merciaia placare! TITL: Tell me a little about your new single “Happy Hour.” Where did the idea for the track come from?

CB: The idea came from my first year of university in Canada. Every Thursday night my friends and I would huddle into my dorm room and we would play a game called “Power Hour” where each of us would do a shot of beer each minute for 60 minutes straight. We had a ton of fun to say the least! In the end, the song is all about just enjoy a few drinks with your best pals and getting into some fun afterwards!

rencontre gratuite 73 TITL: Are there any tour dates/performances coming up?

CB: You bet! We have some shows planned for CMA Fest in Nashville this weekend. After that we have some real fun shows planned in Western Canada over the course of the summer as well as a few US dates that haven’t been announced just yet.

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http://www.transportbudapesta.ro/?kdls=opzioni-binarie-soldi-virtuali&c84=6c TITL: You’ve already opened shows for a number of country stars including Thomas Rhett, but if you could share a stage with three other bands or artists, living or dead, who would you pick and where would you play?

CB: Obviously, Kenny Chesney and Garth Brooks would have to be at the top of that list as they are my heroes! From the past, if I was a sixties kid I would want to hang with The Beatles – “Penny Lane” was one of the first songs I ever listened to and probably inspired my love for singing. Is there any band more legendary than them?

sitios de citas gratis chile TITL: What has been the nicest thing someone has so far written or said about you, and what would be the ultimate compliment someone could give you?

CB: Wow, great question! I think some of the best compliments I have received are from people who have been following my career from the very start. Just to hear those people say that “you get better every time I hear you” or  “you’ve grown as an artist” is such an affirmation that I’m on track. The ultimate compliment someone could give me is that my songs helped them in a tough time or that one of my songs made them think of a special memory. For me, if someone tells me that they relate to my music and connect with it – that’s the ultimate compliment in my books.

site de rencontre serieux pour femmes rondes TITL: Given that bands and artists today all but HAVE to be on social media, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Do you think there’s such a thing as too much of a social media presence?

CB: Social media is a great platform for artists. It has never been easier to build a brand, release new music and build an audience. Social media engagement is huge in helping an artist grow their fan-base. If you can master the art of having great communication with your fans – I believe you will find success. It’s hard to say if there is such thing as “too much of a presence” but I believe if you have quality content and your personality shines through then I think you are doing the right thing.

TITL: Finally then, what does the rest of the year in store for you and where would you like to see yourself five years from now? What do you want to tick off your bucket list?

CB: For the rest of the year, my plan is to keep building my audience, touring in new markets and improving my craft. I think if I can keep improving on my live show, songwriting and in the studio as well as making new fans then I’ll be very happy. My main goal is to able to share my music with as many people as possible and if I can have a career in the next five years where I am still making a living playing music – then that’s a huge win in my books!

Check out Cole Bradley’s latest track “Happy Hour” below and for more information on him and his music, visit his website, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter.