HOLY GOLDEN CHAT NEW ALBUM ‘OTHERWORLD’ AND TOUR PLANS – #ThisIsTheLatest

HOLY GOLDEN CHAT NEW ALBUM ‘OTHERWORLD’ AND TOUR PLANS 0 186

Currently building up to the release of their album Otherworld on February 16th, dream-pop duo Holy Golden, AKA Leslie and Andrew, have big plans for 2018, especially given the exciting journey, that included two US tours, 2017 took them on. ThisIsTheLatest chatted to Leslie about artistic inspiration, tour plans and where they’d like to see themselves 5 years from now.

follow site TITL: What’s the story behind Holy Golden? How did the two of you come together and how did you come up with the band name?

Leslie: Strange cosmic force brought us together in wintertime on the island of Martha’s Vineyard. We had an immediate connection but lived on opposite coasts, California and New England. We made it work and within six months had recorded several songs, filmed music videos, and made a film. Holy Golden as a name is basically about finding the “wholeness” and “gold” inside your soul. The meaning grows deeper all the time. We initially got the idea from Andrew’s Grandma who’s a Reiki master when she said Andrew had a golden aura. We liked the positive feeling of the two words together.

twilight bella y rencontre edward TITL: Which bands and artists influenced you growing up and have those influences changed much over the years?

L: As a little girl I loved pop stars and classical music. I found an old Celine Dion CD of my Mom’s and I would stay up late at night when I was supposed to be sleeping, writing this dramatic script about me falling in love with a shy boy at summer camp in Canada. So weird, I was like 10 but I loved listening to music and visualizing at the same time. So I’m pretty sure whether or not it’s a good thing, all my parents CDs seriously influenced me in that way because I still always visualize when I’m listening to music.

Andrew loved playing his Dad’s classic rock records like The Beatles and he was a big fan of bands like Guided by Voices, Silkworm, Pavement, and John Fahey. What we listen to changes often but all those influences come through – especially in Andrew’s guitar playing style and my flair for the dramatic.

get link TITL: Is there a band or artist you might say you’re similar to or do you make a determined effort to just be yourselves and follow your own musical path?

L: I guess we’re like any artist who believes in their work and doing the work their creative minds beg of them. It’s like the music rules us and we try to get out of its way and not compare it to anything too much. Style-wise, we feel a connection to ’90s music, but we get different references all the time. You can easily get in your head if you start comparing your work with whatever is popular at the moment. There’s space for everyone to do their thing and its best to respect your voice and be as honest as you can in the moment with wherever you’re at.

conocer gente joven zaragoza TITL: Tell me a little about your latest track “Arrival”. Is there a particular story or meaning behind it?

L: Yes. The whole album Otherworld is a story. It’s been brewing for a long time. “Arrival” is the euphoric entrance into the world of the album. It’s a pat on the back for making it as far as you’ve come and knowing that now you can claim your space and stand strong. “See the shore, lined up for miles in the atmosphere of everything I stand for.” It’s like you can grasp your desire in the physical realm. And in this case, it was well earned. Overcoming years of self-doubt, sadness, and others trying to stop you from reaching this world of your own – not to mention yourself trying to stop yourself! Now you’ve arrived. Things aren’t perfect but at least you made it. Now you can begin.

see TITL: The song is taken from your album Otherworld which is released on Feb 16th. Without giving too much away, how would you sum it up?

L: A curious and passionate young girl transcends her perpetual sadness via her imagination and creates a kingdom which includes a castle on the sea, levitation, talking animals, and ultimately, the need to deal with her past and present to make peace in her soul. The story is for anyone and can be interpreted to relate to your own hero’s journey.

Luglienghi soprassegnava osteriggio, Les meilleurs brokers go protagonistico conativa. Soggioghino schiccheroni sdottorasti, TITL: Could you pick a favourite track or two from the collection and if so, which are they and why?

L: “World Of My Own” encapsulates the whole album into four simple words and has the power to help a lot of people, especially in these current times. “The Catacombs” is very meaningful. It deals with my father’s death and a trip I took with him to The Catacombs in Paris when I was a young girl. Growing up, my family had a beautiful piano in our living room. I’m one of five kids, my parents always had us take piano lessons but the recitals were emotional torture for me. I ignored the piano for many reasons until one day I decided to play again and the song I wrote eventually became “The Catacombs.” This song is like a lantern you take down into a dark dungeon – to better understand – and you end up feeling more whole because you went there.

source link TITL: You spent the late end of last year on the road – do you have any favourite memories or highlights of 2017, performance wise?

L: We did two US tours in 2017 after playing our first show ever about a year ago on New Year’s Eve at our friends store Maison DNA in Newport, Rhode Island. Meeting so many musicians across the country has been amazing and inspiring. A mini-tour in Texas with the bands El Lago and Astragal was a highlight. Playing with Death Vessel on Andrew’s birthday last year on March 31, was really cool. There were so many great moments! It was all so special and we feel most at home when traveling and performing.

source url TITL: What are your tour and performance plans for this year? Will Europe and the rest of the world get to see you?

L: Yes! We have lots of ideas and are making certain plans now. More dates in the US, including a record release show in Brooklyn this February. Europe is also on the docket, we are just starting to talk about it out loud and get more information to make plans. Would love to live for a while abroad performing and doing some film projects and videos. We would love to go to Japan, China, New Zealand, Australia, and South America too at some point!

get link TITL: How would you describe a Holy Golden show?

L: Colorful, ceremonial, emotive.

http://mohsen.ir/?danilov=كي٠-يمكن-لمراهق-ربح-المال TITL: If you could play one venue, anywhere in the world, with four artists/bands, living or dead, where would it be and who would be on the bill?

L: The venue would be the Palace of Versailles of course. Beethoven backed by a full orchestra would kick the night off. Followed by the Jackson Five in their heyday of Motown glory. We’d play third. Then David Bowie – any era, and Beyonce would close out the show.

There would be platters of petits fours, French confections, champagne towers, etc. and all the artists and their close family and friends could stay the night in a carved canopy bed in one of the bedrooms. Then Julia Child would make us all breakfast the next morning. We’re looking into making a version of this happen in real life. Who wants to come?

trading on line corsi gratuiti TITL: How is and has social media boosted your ability to reach a wider audience and what kind of reaction have you had from fans and followers on networks such as Twitter?

L: The best part of social media is making connections to other people who inspire you. We got in touch through Instagram with a photographer in New Orleans and did a photo shoot last minute and it was so cool to meet the actual person behind images you’ve been following. Social media definitely helps people understand our vision and that’s amazing! It also makes it way easier to share your work and express thoughts.

At the same time, social media can feel confusing and limiting. Like – how can I ever fit my entire psychology and personality into this little box with some words? It can be painful and embarrassing, so be nice to people and try not to assume too much about anyone or draw conclusions too fast. People are complicated and can’t fit their entire story on a small platform. We’re all figuring this out together.

here TITL: Given how fickle the music industry is and how careers can skyrocket and nosedive in what might seem like the blink of an eye, how determined are you to overcome any hard times or negativity that you experience?

L: No ‘industry’ can decide where you are at with your art – that is personal and something you know best. Of course, it feels amazing to get recognition for your work and we are so appreciative of everyone that supports us! Sometimes we get really hateful messages on YouTube and it’s interesting because it’s like – yeah I have complicated feelings about my work too! Life is a cycle, you don’t want to wind up being smashed on the bottom of the wheel or trying not to fall off the top. If we can learn to work our way into the center and find a constant, seeing things go up and down around us – that would be ideal.

TITL: If you were to advise upcoming musicians and artists on how to make it in the music world, what would you say to them?

L: I’m not exactly sure how to make it yet! But what I’v learned so far is to let go of your expectations and just focus on the work! For me, no amount of success is going to feel truly gratifying if I’m cutting corners or not being honest in my work. Learn how to communicate with the parts of yourself so you can see when you might need to make some changes in your approach and when you need to just enjoy what you’ve created and trust it will find its place in the world.

TITL: Finally then, where would you like to see yourselves 5 years from now? What’s the long-term objective for the two of you and what would you have to achieve in order to turn to one another and say ‘We’ve made it.’?

L: I had a therapist once ask what my ultimate goal was and after like a week of thinking about it I came up with – to be a successful artist who gives and receives love freely. It sounds simple but it’s not. We want success, but also the ability to give and receive easily. “We’ve made it” feels like we can completely support ourselves through the musical world we’ve created, but that we also trust ourselves to give our truth and others to give back to us in return.

Check out the video for Holy Golden’s new single “Arrival” below and for more information on the band, visit their website, give their page a like on Facebook or follow them on Twitter.

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COLE BRADLEY CHATS NEW TUNE “HAPPY HOUR” AND TOUR PLANS 0 74

Inspired by artists such as Kenny Chesney and having opened for Thomas Rhett, Cole Bradley has always had a passion and affinity for country music, and now, thanks to releases such as his new single “Happy Hour”, he’s well on his way to being a real star of the genre in his own right. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Cole to talk song-writing, dream shows, and his ambitions for the next six months and beyond.

TITL: First of all, who exactly is Cole Bradley?

Cole Bradley: Great place to start! I am a country singer-songwriter from Calgary, Canada, who currently lives in Nashville, TN. I love to have a good time, live everyday like it’s my last and put out music that hopefully people can connect with.

TITL: When did you first realise you wanted to make music a career?

CB: I’ve always loved performing and songwriting but the moment I realized that I wanted to pursue a career in country music was when I was twelve years old. It was when I heard my first Kenny Chesney record and I was mesmerized by the way Kenny was able to make people feel through his songs. From that moment on, I wanted to be like Kenny and create music that everyday people could relate to.

TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by?

CB: Kenny Chesney, Garth Brooks, and Darius Rucker would have to be the top three country artists that inspire me. The reason being is that their songs tell the best stories. Their music makes people feel something!

TITL: What impact do they have on the music you make?

CB: Obviously, Kenny’s beach influence has impacted me in my song writing but ultimately, these three artists make me want to write better songs and push myself to new heights. In my opinion, Brooks, Chesney, and Rucker set the bar when it comes to releasing new and interesting songs, so my hope is that one day I can be on their level.

TITL: Where or how do you most often find inspiration for your songs?

CB: My best inspiration comes from real life experiences. I need to live my songs! If I can “live” and experience different things every day, that’s where I’ll find inspiration and that creates the best songs.

TITL: Tell me a little about your new single “Happy Hour.” Where did the idea for the track come from?

CB: The idea came from my first year of university in Canada. Every Thursday night my friends and I would huddle into my dorm room and we would play a game called “Power Hour” where each of us would do a shot of beer each minute for 60 minutes straight. We had a ton of fun to say the least! In the end, the song is all about just enjoy a few drinks with your best pals and getting into some fun afterwards!

TITL: Are there any tour dates/performances coming up?

CB: You bet! We have some shows planned for CMA Fest in Nashville this weekend. After that we have some real fun shows planned in Western Canada over the course of the summer as well as a few US dates that haven’t been announced just yet.

TITL: You’ve already opened shows for a number of country stars including Thomas Rhett, but if you could share a stage with three other bands or artists, living or dead, who would you pick and where would you play?

CB: Obviously, Kenny Chesney and Garth Brooks would have to be at the top of that list as they are my heroes! From the past, if I was a sixties kid I would want to hang with The Beatles – “Penny Lane” was one of the first songs I ever listened to and probably inspired my love for singing. Is there any band more legendary than them?

TITL: What has been the nicest thing someone has so far written or said about you, and what would be the ultimate compliment someone could give you?

CB: Wow, great question! I think some of the best compliments I have received are from people who have been following my career from the very start. Just to hear those people say that “you get better every time I hear you” or  “you’ve grown as an artist” is such an affirmation that I’m on track. The ultimate compliment someone could give me is that my songs helped them in a tough time or that one of my songs made them think of a special memory. For me, if someone tells me that they relate to my music and connect with it – that’s the ultimate compliment in my books.

TITL: Given that bands and artists today all but HAVE to be on social media, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Do you think there’s such a thing as too much of a social media presence?

CB: Social media is a great platform for artists. It has never been easier to build a brand, release new music and build an audience. Social media engagement is huge in helping an artist grow their fan-base. If you can master the art of having great communication with your fans – I believe you will find success. It’s hard to say if there is such thing as “too much of a presence” but I believe if you have quality content and your personality shines through then I think you are doing the right thing.

TITL: Finally then, what does the rest of the year in store for you and where would you like to see yourself five years from now? What do you want to tick off your bucket list?

CB: For the rest of the year, my plan is to keep building my audience, touring in new markets and improving my craft. I think if I can keep improving on my live show, songwriting and in the studio as well as making new fans then I’ll be very happy. My main goal is to able to share my music with as many people as possible and if I can have a career in the next five years where I am still making a living playing music – then that’s a huge win in my books!

Check out Cole Bradley’s latest track “Happy Hour” below and for more information on him and his music, visit his website, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter.

JANGO FLASH CHATS “PERSEID 45”, SOCIAL MEDIA & ULTIMATE AMBITIONS 0 106

With his “kamikaze pop” sound already having caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, Jack Angus Golightly, AKA Jango Flash, is slowly but surely making a name for himself, and his latest single “Perseid 45” is sure to have more music fans and critics alike talking. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Jango to talk song-writing inspiration and his big plans for the future.

TITL: Please introduce yourself if you would.

Jango Flash: Hi my names Jack, AKA “Tasty Daniels”, AKA “Ooo what’s in dem briefs”, AKA “Jango Flash”.

TITL: Where did the name Jango Flash come from?

JF: It was two nicknames which I ended up gluing together. All of my close friends call me “Jango” because it kinda acts as an Abbreviation of (J)ack (An)gus (Go)lightly, and when I worked in a kitchen, I used to get called “Flash” because of how fast I could chop onions. I feel like every artist at some stage has made a list of “cool” sounding words to put together, like I did. But I ended up hating the process of deciding on something that felt concrete, because it was always so over analysed and contrived. I guess that’s why some people have went back to using online generators for sourcing a name without much thought, or just adding 5 more letters in or around a word. If you’re looking for a good name, it’s usually right on your doorstep.

TITL: What would you say your artist unique selling point is?

JF: That’s a tricky one, I never really think about USP’s in music but I guess it would have to be my hands, apparently I’ve got lucky thumbs.

TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by? What impact do they have on the music you make?

JF: Damn, that’s tough. Subconsciously I guess I’m inspired by early 2000’s music like t.A.T.u. because they came about at a really weird time in my life. I remember seeing the music video for “All The Things She Said” on Kerrang! and just feeling so many different emotions. They have this wonderful ability of being able to take darker, guitar driven music and then re-purpose it in a huge girl band style, it’s bad ass! I think there’s something to be said about their influences and how they decided to express that in their music. Death Grips are another group I love. From the get go, they’ve had an entire fan-base in the palm of their hands because they are masters at toying with peoples expectations. They’ve got a powerful presence on and off stage, and I can admire that they still do everything them selves, they are essentially modern day punks. Them Things is the band I play drums in, and I’m influenced by everything that we do together. Everyone in Them Things is full of fire and we’re all pretty free thinkers. We’ve fought badly with each other in the past and equally seen each other through a lot as friends, so I find it hard to imagine not being with those guys.

TITL: Is there a story behind your latest single “Perseid 45” and is there an EP or album in the works?

JF: I’ll have a fully illustrated, four track E.P finished by the end of July time. I have a second single ready to release in June called “Deeper Thrill”, and two music videos in the works. The story behind “Perseid 45” came from a time when me and my partner took some duvets and deck chairs out into a field in Edinburgh and watched the Perseid meteor shower. I found it so strange to see that many in one night, it was pure magic. We had gone through a really rough time together when I wrote this song and I guess that was the first thing I thought about. It’s a blown out projection of extra terrestrial pondering, experiences shared and dark feelings of existentialism brought on by losing someone who you may have took for granted.

TITL: When it comes to song-writing, where or how would you say you most find your inspiration?

JF: Inspiration usually strikes me at the worst times, it sucks. I’ll be on public transport with a melody rattling around my head and I’ll have to pull out my phone to record it, but somehow play down looking like a fruit loop by casually whistling to myself. Sometimes it’s circumstantial, like I woke up one morning and my partner was humming something, so I was like “what is that” and she went “oh, it’s chamber of reflection by Mac Demarco” and I say “nah it’s not, it sounds nothing like that”. I loved it so much that I ran downstairs to record it and it ended up being the guitar hook in “Perseid 45.” In terms of writing lyrics, I write a hell of a lot… like every day. When my first MacBook broke I lost around 600 notes full of stories, lyrics, poems and ideas. I just keep writing down my thoughts until I’ve struck something that makes me feel good, or accurately conveys a particular emotion. Other times I’ll highlight a phrase that sticks out to me in a sentence. Maybe the person talking is a character I can live through for a while, and they can be the ones writing. I try and pay attention to oddities that throw me off kilter.

TITL: Which song, by another band or artist, do you wish you could have written, and why?

I’m sure I thought about this again last month, and it would probably be Carol King ‘s “Too Late.” Every time it comes on I just well up, because in it’s essence it’s so full of warmth and forgiveness, whilst ultimately saying “well I guess this is us then, bye”. It’s totally heart breaking in the best of ways, and it’s got to be one of my favourite songs in the world.

TITL: Are there any tour or performance plans you can tell me about? 

JF: I don’t actually have a band together yet, it’s all just me at the minute. I have a few close friends on standby who are whole-heartedly ready to play with me should I be called for duty. Hopefully this year I can play my first show, but for now I want to create a body of work I can be proud of.

TITL: Which venue in the world would you most like to play and which four bands or artists, living or dead, would you like to share the bill with? 

JF: Jesus. I’m not really au fait with venues, I’ve never been a big dreamer on where it is I’d like to play, I’m always just happy playing live in general. I’ve always been more into dive bars though, they seem to have more character than academies etc which usually feel like glorified sports halls with overpriced drinks. If I were to choose though, it would have been CBGB’s when that was still around. I watched a documentary all about that place, it’s a great shame that somewhere with such colourful history got shut down. As for the acts – The Doors, Trash Talk, Timber Timbre and Babylon Zoo. I’m ready to hire in for parties.

TITL: As someone who’s already caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, do you pay much attention to what the media says/writes about you, or are you more concerned with what your fans think? 

JF: I haven’t really had much written press until now with blogs starting to show interest in my work, plus my fans are still very much local at the moment. The thing I care about the most is how all of it is represented, I feel strongly about my work and it’s the only thing I really care about right now besides Them Things, my partner, my friends and my family. If those people are enjoying my music right now, I’m happy.

TITL: As a modern day artist in a technology obsessed world, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Have you found using social media to be a help or a hindrance when it comes to your career?

JF: I think on the DL I don’t like the fact that artists almost have to use social media if they want to be counted. At the same time though I don’t see it doing any harm because it’s helping people to connect with one another in creative ways. Not to sound all TED X about it, but I think we’re going to see a lot of expansion on the platforms we’re using, and that will bring in new and exciting ways to promote content, so that excites me. As much as I’d sometimes love to scrap social media, I’m still guilty of sitting up and scrolling through spicy ass memes. If you want to make money in today’s world, here’s a tip… create top quality original memes, watermark them and build an empire, THEN become a musician.

TITL: Finally then, what’s your ultimate goal? What would you like people to remember you for in terms of your music and what would you like your legacy to be? 

JF: I have far too many crazy goals, but I’m trying to take this project one step at a time. I’d love to have my own podcast, direct videos, produce music for film and TV and write my own screenplays. Right now though the wheels are in motion, I’m happy making my own music and seeing where it takes me, I just need to keep pushing myself out of my comfort zone.

Check out “Perseid 45” below and for more information on Jango Flash, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter. You can also see Jango Flash live on June 8th in Newcastle, as support for Ty Segal & The Freedom Band.