LIVE: THE SCRIPT @ MANCHESTER ARENA – FEBRUARY 3RD 2018 146

After a hugely successful mini-tour back in August and September ahead of fifth studio album Freedom Child’s release, it was really only a matter of time before The Script found their way back to the place they truly feel at home – on stage. But, before they delighted the thousands of die-hard fans, some of whom had queued since 2am to get the best spots at the barrier, who had sold-out Manchester Arena, it was up to Ella Eyre to metaphorically, and given the biting February cold, literally help warm them up ahead of the main event.

Ella walked on stage to a rapidly filling arena and for the next half hour, danced, shimmied and sang her way into the hearts of many before her. Vocally, she may not have been the strongest female to have graced the arena stage, but she certainly proved herself to be one of the most energetic as she encouraged the crowd to sing and dance along, especially to closing number and smash hit “Came Here For Love” which went down a storm.

After an interval of around half an hour, during which time a four sided curtain shrouded the B stage towards the back of the arena, the lights dimmed once more and, almost simultaneously, the cheering proceeded to get louder and louder. As the curtain fell away to the opening notes of “Superheroes”, the band, drummer Glen, guitarist Mark and front-man Danny, complete with newly dyed blonde locks, made their first appearance before their ecstatic audience, with Danny bouncing up and down brimming with the energy of a man half his age, but with a vocal that’s never sounded better.

Having told their fans via Twitter that this new tour was to be very interactive, following “Rock The World”, the band proceeded to prove said comment via “Paint The Town Green” and with Glen armed with a mini drum and Mark leading the way with his guitar, the band made their way through the packed crowd down to the front and onto the main stage.

“It’s Not Right For You” offered up the first real opportunity for the thousands packed into the venue to show off their vocal skills, and they seized said opportunity happily as their “oh-oh-oh’s” echoed around the vast space, before they earned themselves rapturous applause from Glen and bassist Ben in particular for their efforts during “The Man Who Can’t Be Moved.”

As Danny took a seat at the piano that had by now appeared on stage, he began to play the intro to “Wonders”, a track from the bands’ latest album which had already proven itself (given the Twitter reaction it’s received in recent months) to be a new fan favourite, so needless to say, as the thousands present finally heard it live for the first time, they were more than a little happy. One individual close to the front was likely even more so, when, mid-song, having left the piano, Danny proceeded to reach over, grab their drink and take a swig of it. The trio then continued to power their way through their set, delivering hit song after hit song – “Six Degrees Of Separation” and “Nothing” being just two, with applause and cheers rarely far from their ears. “If You Could See Me Now” meanwhile had many audience members, myself included, on the verge of tears, and the emotion in Danny’s voice, and in his eyes, was clear for all to hear and see.

“No Man Is An Island” had practically everyone in attendance (at least those I could see), including those in the seats, at Danny’s instruction, placing their left arm around the shoulder of the person next to them and taking eight steps to the left and eight to the right in time with the music – it made for quite a sight, one which has seen the crowd since be referred to, rather humorously, as “penguins.”

Continuing to be extremely (and surprisingly) interactive during with the crowd their set, the band then appeared in the middle of the seating area, surrounded by standing fans, and proceeded to play renditions of “If You Ever Come Back” and the beautifully melodic “Never Seen Anything Quite Like You”, before, as Mark and Glen made their way back to the main stage, Danny continued to delight those in the tiers by singing “The Energy Never Dies” as he made his way through the crowd back towards his bandmates.

It’s not every day you see fans hold up umbrellas indoors, but that’s exactly what some did during the performance of “Rain”, the song that rounded off the main set. Having left the stage for a few minutes, during which the sound of thousands of stamping feet and rapidly increasing in volume cheers echoed from all corners of the venue, the band then returned for their encore, kicking it off with “No Good In Goodbye”, closely followed by “Breakeven.”

With tonight being the first show the band have played in the arena since 2015, and following the bombing last year, it was touching to then see Danny introduce on stage the Parrs Wood High School Harmony Choir, who performed with Ariana Grande at the One Love Manchester concert.

He then went on to give an emotive and passionate speech about freedom:

“We all stand united together Manchester. That’s what this album is about; freedom. The freedom of expression, to love who you wanna love, to be who you wanna be, to say what you wanna say. Have no fear. Never fear! Now to me, music has always been the one true religion, because it accepts you no matter who you are, what colour, what creed, what sex, what shape, what nationality…it cares not. It’s always been there for me since I was young, and I’m guessing, by looking at all of you, it was there for you too.”

He called on everyone present to take out their phones and record the moment that was unfolding, inviting them to make a memory with him and the band. That moment, with thousands of lights filling the arena, created what Danny referred to as “a whole constellation of stars” of which he said, “every one of those is a portal to the outside world, and we’re going to give them a moment to remember.” As he asked if Manchester was ready to “make a moment”, the roaring cheer he received in response told him the answer was an emphatic ‘yes.’ From there “Hall Of Fame”, with the choir adding an extra special something to the performance, closed out the set, ending it on an undeniable high.

With over a dozen more dates still left for the band to perform on this leg of the tour, and likely scores more yet to be announced, tonight The Script not only entertained those before them, but also got those with tickets for upcoming shows, and following the show on social media, even more hyped up. They might have been away for close to three years, but given the energy and passion with which they performed each and every song, together with the reaction of the crowd, tonight in Manchester, it was like they never went away at all.

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COLE BRADLEY CHATS NEW TUNE “HAPPY HOUR” AND TOUR PLANS 49

Inspired by artists such as Kenny Chesney and having opened for Thomas Rhett, Cole Bradley has always had a passion and affinity for country music, and now, thanks to releases such as his new single “Happy Hour”, he’s well on his way to being a real star of the genre in his own right. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Cole to talk song-writing, dream shows, and his ambitions for the next six months and beyond.

go to site TITL: First of all, who exactly is Cole Bradley?

Cole Bradley: Great place to start! I am a country singer-songwriter from Calgary, Canada, who currently lives in Nashville, TN. I love to have a good time, live everyday like it’s my last and put out music that hopefully people can connect with.

http://laprovence.sk/familjarnosty/2361 TITL: When did you first realise you wanted to make music a career?

CB: I’ve always loved performing and songwriting but the moment I realized that I wanted to pursue a career in country music was when I was twelve years old. It was when I heard my first Kenny Chesney record and I was mesmerized by the way Kenny was able to make people feel through his songs. From that moment on, I wanted to be like Kenny and create music that everyday people could relate to.

TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by?

CB: Kenny Chesney, Garth Brooks, and Darius Rucker would have to be the top three country artists that inspire me. The reason being is that their songs tell the best stories. Their music makes people feel something!

watch TITL: What impact do they have on the music you make?

CB: Obviously, Kenny’s beach influence has impacted me in my song writing but ultimately, these three artists make me want to write better songs and push myself to new heights. In my opinion, Brooks, Chesney, and Rucker set the bar when it comes to releasing new and interesting songs, so my hope is that one day I can be on their level.

follow url TITL: Where or how do you most often find inspiration for your songs?

CB: My best inspiration comes from real life experiences. I need to live my songs! If I can “live” and experience different things every day, that’s where I’ll find inspiration and that creates the best songs.

http://www.judithschlosser.ch/?ityrew=info-opzioni-digitali&4f3=fd TITL: Tell me a little about your new single “Happy Hour.” Where did the idea for the track come from?

CB: The idea came from my first year of university in Canada. Every Thursday night my friends and I would huddle into my dorm room and we would play a game called “Power Hour” where each of us would do a shot of beer each minute for 60 minutes straight. We had a ton of fun to say the least! In the end, the song is all about just enjoy a few drinks with your best pals and getting into some fun afterwards!

click here, Corsi operazioni binarie principianti. Recomendamos el uso de IE explorer, Fire Fox o Google Chrome para una mejor TITL: Are there any tour dates/performances coming up?

CB: You bet! We have some shows planned for CMA Fest in Nashville this weekend. After that we have some real fun shows planned in Western Canada over the course of the summer as well as a few US dates that haven’t been announced just yet.

50 primeras citas online espaГ±ol peliculasyonkis

https://dunkl.co.at/deposti/9237 TITL: You’ve already opened shows for a number of country stars including Thomas Rhett, but if you could share a stage with three other bands or artists, living or dead, who would you pick and where would you play?

CB: Obviously, Kenny Chesney and Garth Brooks would have to be at the top of that list as they are my heroes! From the past, if I was a sixties kid I would want to hang with The Beatles – “Penny Lane” was one of the first songs I ever listened to and probably inspired my love for singing. Is there any band more legendary than them?

http://teentube.cz/?ertye=conocer-gente-hablar-ingles&ab0=65 TITL: What has been the nicest thing someone has so far written or said about you, and what would be the ultimate compliment someone could give you?

CB: Wow, great question! I think some of the best compliments I have received are from people who have been following my career from the very start. Just to hear those people say that “you get better every time I hear you” or  “you’ve grown as an artist” is such an affirmation that I’m on track. The ultimate compliment someone could give me is that my songs helped them in a tough time or that one of my songs made them think of a special memory. For me, if someone tells me that they relate to my music and connect with it – that’s the ultimate compliment in my books.

rencontres nationales des scot 2015 TITL: Given that bands and artists today all but HAVE to be on social media, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Do you think there’s such a thing as too much of a social media presence?

CB: Social media is a great platform for artists. It has never been easier to build a brand, release new music and build an audience. Social media engagement is huge in helping an artist grow their fan-base. If you can master the art of having great communication with your fans – I believe you will find success. It’s hard to say if there is such thing as “too much of a presence” but I believe if you have quality content and your personality shines through then I think you are doing the right thing.

TITL: Finally then, what does the rest of the year in store for you and where would you like to see yourself five years from now? What do you want to tick off your bucket list?

CB: For the rest of the year, my plan is to keep building my audience, touring in new markets and improving my craft. I think if I can keep improving on my live show, songwriting and in the studio as well as making new fans then I’ll be very happy. My main goal is to able to share my music with as many people as possible and if I can have a career in the next five years where I am still making a living playing music – then that’s a huge win in my books!

Check out Cole Bradley’s latest track “Happy Hour” below and for more information on him and his music, visit his website, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter.

JANGO FLASH CHATS “PERSEID 45”, SOCIAL MEDIA & ULTIMATE AMBITIONS 79

With his “kamikaze pop” sound already having caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, Jack Angus Golightly, AKA Jango Flash, is slowly but surely making a name for himself, and his latest single “Perseid 45” is sure to have more music fans and critics alike talking. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Jango to talk song-writing inspiration and his big plans for the future.

TITL: Please introduce yourself if you would.

Jango Flash: Hi my names Jack, AKA “Tasty Daniels”, AKA “Ooo what’s in dem briefs”, AKA “Jango Flash”.

TITL: Where did the name Jango Flash come from?

JF: It was two nicknames which I ended up gluing together. All of my close friends call me “Jango” because it kinda acts as an Abbreviation of (J)ack (An)gus (Go)lightly, and when I worked in a kitchen, I used to get called “Flash” because of how fast I could chop onions. I feel like every artist at some stage has made a list of “cool” sounding words to put together, like I did. But I ended up hating the process of deciding on something that felt concrete, because it was always so over analysed and contrived. I guess that’s why some people have went back to using online generators for sourcing a name without much thought, or just adding 5 more letters in or around a word. If you’re looking for a good name, it’s usually right on your doorstep.

TITL: What would you say your artist unique selling point is?

JF: That’s a tricky one, I never really think about USP’s in music but I guess it would have to be my hands, apparently I’ve got lucky thumbs.

TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by? What impact do they have on the music you make?

JF: Damn, that’s tough. Subconsciously I guess I’m inspired by early 2000’s music like t.A.T.u. because they came about at a really weird time in my life. I remember seeing the music video for “All The Things She Said” on Kerrang! and just feeling so many different emotions. They have this wonderful ability of being able to take darker, guitar driven music and then re-purpose it in a huge girl band style, it’s bad ass! I think there’s something to be said about their influences and how they decided to express that in their music. Death Grips are another group I love. From the get go, they’ve had an entire fan-base in the palm of their hands because they are masters at toying with peoples expectations. They’ve got a powerful presence on and off stage, and I can admire that they still do everything them selves, they are essentially modern day punks. Them Things is the band I play drums in, and I’m influenced by everything that we do together. Everyone in Them Things is full of fire and we’re all pretty free thinkers. We’ve fought badly with each other in the past and equally seen each other through a lot as friends, so I find it hard to imagine not being with those guys.

TITL: Is there a story behind your latest single “Perseid 45” and is there an EP or album in the works?

JF: I’ll have a fully illustrated, four track E.P finished by the end of July time. I have a second single ready to release in June called “Deeper Thrill”, and two music videos in the works. The story behind “Perseid 45” came from a time when me and my partner took some duvets and deck chairs out into a field in Edinburgh and watched the Perseid meteor shower. I found it so strange to see that many in one night, it was pure magic. We had gone through a really rough time together when I wrote this song and I guess that was the first thing I thought about. It’s a blown out projection of extra terrestrial pondering, experiences shared and dark feelings of existentialism brought on by losing someone who you may have took for granted.

TITL: When it comes to song-writing, where or how would you say you most find your inspiration?

JF: Inspiration usually strikes me at the worst times, it sucks. I’ll be on public transport with a melody rattling around my head and I’ll have to pull out my phone to record it, but somehow play down looking like a fruit loop by casually whistling to myself. Sometimes it’s circumstantial, like I woke up one morning and my partner was humming something, so I was like “what is that” and she went “oh, it’s chamber of reflection by Mac Demarco” and I say “nah it’s not, it sounds nothing like that”. I loved it so much that I ran downstairs to record it and it ended up being the guitar hook in “Perseid 45.” In terms of writing lyrics, I write a hell of a lot… like every day. When my first MacBook broke I lost around 600 notes full of stories, lyrics, poems and ideas. I just keep writing down my thoughts until I’ve struck something that makes me feel good, or accurately conveys a particular emotion. Other times I’ll highlight a phrase that sticks out to me in a sentence. Maybe the person talking is a character I can live through for a while, and they can be the ones writing. I try and pay attention to oddities that throw me off kilter.

TITL: Which song, by another band or artist, do you wish you could have written, and why?

I’m sure I thought about this again last month, and it would probably be Carol King ‘s “Too Late.” Every time it comes on I just well up, because in it’s essence it’s so full of warmth and forgiveness, whilst ultimately saying “well I guess this is us then, bye”. It’s totally heart breaking in the best of ways, and it’s got to be one of my favourite songs in the world.

TITL: Are there any tour or performance plans you can tell me about? 

JF: I don’t actually have a band together yet, it’s all just me at the minute. I have a few close friends on standby who are whole-heartedly ready to play with me should I be called for duty. Hopefully this year I can play my first show, but for now I want to create a body of work I can be proud of.

TITL: Which venue in the world would you most like to play and which four bands or artists, living or dead, would you like to share the bill with? 

JF: Jesus. I’m not really au fait with venues, I’ve never been a big dreamer on where it is I’d like to play, I’m always just happy playing live in general. I’ve always been more into dive bars though, they seem to have more character than academies etc which usually feel like glorified sports halls with overpriced drinks. If I were to choose though, it would have been CBGB’s when that was still around. I watched a documentary all about that place, it’s a great shame that somewhere with such colourful history got shut down. As for the acts – The Doors, Trash Talk, Timber Timbre and Babylon Zoo. I’m ready to hire in for parties.

TITL: As someone who’s already caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, do you pay much attention to what the media says/writes about you, or are you more concerned with what your fans think? 

JF: I haven’t really had much written press until now with blogs starting to show interest in my work, plus my fans are still very much local at the moment. The thing I care about the most is how all of it is represented, I feel strongly about my work and it’s the only thing I really care about right now besides Them Things, my partner, my friends and my family. If those people are enjoying my music right now, I’m happy.

TITL: As a modern day artist in a technology obsessed world, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Have you found using social media to be a help or a hindrance when it comes to your career?

JF: I think on the DL I don’t like the fact that artists almost have to use social media if they want to be counted. At the same time though I don’t see it doing any harm because it’s helping people to connect with one another in creative ways. Not to sound all TED X about it, but I think we’re going to see a lot of expansion on the platforms we’re using, and that will bring in new and exciting ways to promote content, so that excites me. As much as I’d sometimes love to scrap social media, I’m still guilty of sitting up and scrolling through spicy ass memes. If you want to make money in today’s world, here’s a tip… create top quality original memes, watermark them and build an empire, THEN become a musician.

TITL: Finally then, what’s your ultimate goal? What would you like people to remember you for in terms of your music and what would you like your legacy to be? 

JF: I have far too many crazy goals, but I’m trying to take this project one step at a time. I’d love to have my own podcast, direct videos, produce music for film and TV and write my own screenplays. Right now though the wheels are in motion, I’m happy making my own music and seeing where it takes me, I just need to keep pushing myself out of my comfort zone.

Check out “Perseid 45” below and for more information on Jango Flash, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter. You can also see Jango Flash live on June 8th in Newcastle, as support for Ty Segal & The Freedom Band.