KAYO WASHIO OF JAPAN’S WOWOW BROADCAST NETWORK TALKS HANDLING PROJECTS & PRESSURE – #ThisIsTheLatest

KAYO WASHIO OF JAPAN’S WOWOW BROADCAST NETWORK TALKS HANDLING PROJECTS & PRESSURE 0 146

As the head of US Operations for what has been described as Japan’s version of HBO, WOWOW, Kayo Washio is used to working under pressure and alongside some of the biggest names in the business. With five projects currently in development, ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Kayo to talk about how much the broadcast industry has changed and continues to evolve, the acquisition she’s most proud of and her advice for anyone looking to follow in her footsteps.

http://salsiando.com/finelit/899 TITL: What is it about broadcasting that encouraged you to make it a career path and how did you get started?

Kayo Washio: I have a relative who worked for the U.N. in New York City and was a licensed attorney who passed the New York State Bar. She was born and raised in Japan, like I was. Because of her, I wanted to be an international attorney, starting from the time I was in high school.  When I enrolled and attended University, I selected International Law as my major. While studying, I learned that law practice and enforcement has a lot of gray areas and I soon came to the realization that this was not the field I could spend a lifetime working in. At that time, while I was in the midst thinking of what I truly loved to do, I discovered a unique ‘unknown’ person who accomplished a remarkable feat, and thought it would make for a great interview feature for an outlet. I arranged a job interview for myself with a TV broadcaster to become a reporter/creator and to make a program for reporting on this great figure I discovered – in Japan, you don’t need to work for a company that relates to your major at your college. This experience allowed me to begin working for WOWOW right after I graduated university.

ou rencontrer femme riche TITL: It could be argued that, like film, the broadcasting industry is dominated by men. With that in mind, how much, or little, of a struggle has it been for you to pave your way and make a name for yourself as well as you have in recent years? Are you seeing a rise in the number of women joining the business and if so, does such please you?

KW: Having worked for an established ‘old guard’ type of Japanese company for about 20 years and working in Japan for about 15 years before moving to Los Angeles, I can say I have much more freedom and flexibility here in U.S. The entertainment industry in the U.S. is much, much, much less dominated by men compared to Japan.

There are many cultural and business rules in Japan that play into gender inequality. Some of you might realize that we exchange business cards by holding our card with both hands when we meet a new person – right at the onset of the meeting before having any conversation. The order in which cards are exchanged is important, and rules dictate that you should exchange cards with the person with the highest title, which in Japan is normally the oldest man. I’ve often seen the awkward situation here in the U.S. where senior executives try to exchange a business card with an American older male first, even if a female has higher position.

I understand it’s very difficult, but eventually I would like to have a society where we do not need to talk about these gender disparity issues. Like most, I just want to work with talented people who I enjoy collaborating with – regardless of gender, race, nationality, ethnicity, etc. Life is short and we are all one human race.

go to site TITL: enter site For those who don’t understand the way in which broadcasting and its companies work, what are the main objectives of your job as the head of U.S. Operations?

KW: Basically, the objective of my job is to secure the best content – films, TV series, special award shows, concerts, etc. – for our service in Japan. WOWOW has established and maintained tremendous relationships with studios, networks and content rights holders for about the last 30 years, which positions us well to make great acquisitions. Growing and nurturing these relationships in the U.S. is so important for a foreign company like WOWOW. I am diligent in trying to foster even more relationships through an open and transparent exchange of information with new companies on a daily basis and explore new relationships not only from the sales side, but also on the production side through our co-production projects. This all dovetails another very important objective – building the WOWOW brand name here in the U.S.

http://hickscountry.com/index.php?xml_sitemap=params=pt-wpcf7_contact_form-2014-11 TITL: Is there one aspect of your job you like more than any other or do you just enjoy the different every day challenges that come your way?

KW: I love waking up every day to the opportunity of working with very talented creators and artists. These kinds of opportunities have motivated me to keep aiming high and stoke my passion for the next hit project! I’m always mobile too. I’m not a type of person who can sit in an office from 9-6 every single day.

In Japan, most companies have a job rotation system whereby every 3-5 years employees are transferred to a different department within the company and assigned new job duties without any reason. Because of this system, Japanese people are used to working with various titles. But here in the U.S., more value is placed on experience, expertise and relationships and how these are built over time by working in the same field. I very much prefer the American approach on this front.

go here TITL: WOWOW is essentially the Japan version of HBO – how do you feel about the comparisons, and would you agree with them?

KW: While there is a difference in brand name recognition worldwide, where HBO is bigger and more widely recognized, I think HBO and WOWOW are alike in that the two companies strive to be the preeminent suppliers of premium content.

Comparing WOWOW with HBO is not an apples to apples comparison though. The base systems are different. In Japan, people don’t need to pay any fees to watch network TV and many households still do not carry cable nor satellite. WOWOW as a business is not worried about chord cutting in the same way HBO and other television channels have been, but are intelligently adapting to now. Viewers would have been able to subscribe to WOWOW directly since the launch of our service in 1991.

Systems aside, when it comes to programming, I think WOWOW has similar programming selection criteria to HBO, and that is a great thing for audiences who expect the best quality of movies, TV series and events. As a premium pay television service, we would like to show only best quality content from all over the world to our subscribers. For example, we broadcast movies that have had great box office results in Japan from all major studios and also great quality movies from all over the world such as awarded films at film festivals.

WOWOW curates the best content in each area. We have aired four major tennis tournaments, since we consider them the premiere tennis events; licensed the best American shows every year; produced top original documentaries and TV series, which were created with very talented Japanese creators and Japanese artists; and started doing co-productions five years ago to produce our original programs with international creators and artists.

telefonos de mujeres solteras en houston TITL: Your job has allowed you to work with Martin Scorsese and executive produce his documentary “The New York Review of Books: A 50 Year Argument.” How did you get involved with that project and how did you find working with such a highly respected individual?

KW: It was through my relationship with a sales agent whom I worked with on the documentary “Cathedrals of Culture.” She informed me that Martin Scorsese was coming to Berlin at the time I was there for the world premiere of ‘Cathedrals”, and that he would be giving a presentation about his next passion project. So naturally, I rearranged my travel to attend his presentation and began thinking about ways to structure working together. I had twice interviewed Martin before, for my program in Japan, but of course this was a totally different interaction and I was very excited about this opportunity.

Martin Scorsese is fascinating and truly brilliant. I don’t know how he handles all the things he has going on in his world. He remembers every detail of everything he has seen and done and knows how he should handle every deal and circumstance!!! His knowledge of movies is second to none. For example, I learned quickly that he has more knowledgeable of Japanese films and Japanese directors than me. I was also fascinated with the fact that he doesn’t create any walls between himself and newcomers in the business. He treats everyone equally – with respect. That says a lot about his character and composition. I really hope I can join another project of his again in the near future!

http://www.mabnapouyesh.com/dfdf/357 TITL: You’ve also handled negotiations for projects involving Robert Redford, Wim Wenders and others. Given the pressure you must feel in those situations, how do you stay focused and relaxed? 

KW: In these situations my feelings were more of excitement than pressure! I of course knew all about the legendary Robert Redford and Wim Wenders before I started to work on the project. I just felt that if I joined their project, I would rather enjoy the experience and be fully immersed and contribute rather than be shy and passive! One thing I’ve always kept in mind since the first day I started as a producer is that I want all people who work with me to want to work with me again, even after challenging times like a hard negotiation or having creative differences. This is my goal for everybody who has worked with me. I hope they felt that way too.

nadex binary options taxes TITL: Is there any one of projects/acquisitions you’re particularly proud of? If so, which is and why?

KW: Producing a film or event is so difficult that I feel a great sense of accomplishment with all the projects I have had the privilege to be involved in, and am proud of every one! If I have to single out one project though, I would say a small mini-documentary about Baz Luhrmann was especially gratifying for me. This was a passion project of mine in 2003 and WOWOW at the time couldn’t understand why I would produce this particular documentary. But I felt it was necessary for me to introduce our subscribers to Baz Luhrmannn’s vision and his unique way of thinking, as well as the people surrounding him in his private studio. I really felt this program would inspire WOWOW viewers and encourage them to purse their dreams.

I remember telling my boss at the time that I would put my own money into producing this program, but I needed to have a slot for broadcasting it. In the end, I got a very small budget approved by WOWOW, which is still the lowest budget I’ve ever had to work with, and we made a great documentary. To this day, I watch this program whenever I have difficulties because it reminds me where I came from and encourages me to enjoy the process, even if it’s very tough, to achieve my goals.

binaire opties abn TITL: Are there any projects or negotiations underway you can tell me about?

KW: This is a very exciting time at WOWOW as I have five projects currently in development. I can’t reveal many details just yet, other than to say they will all be narrative features. I think audiences will be excited when we make the announcements very soon!

http://havanatranquility.com/daeso/5863 TITL: With the rise in social media and illegal streaming sites, are you finding your job any harder to do in terms of being able to get a good deal for clients and broadcasters who fret about audience figures and the like?

KW: This is a great question. The situation stemming from evolving technologies definitely costs us more than before and forces us to spend much more time dealing with agreements and recognizing and addressing new technology related components. Generally speaking, Japan is as advanced technologically as any nation, but it seems our problems and the serious issues that arise are at a lower volume compared to other technically advanced countries.

http://ebbandflowdesigns.com/?ruioed=1-2-3-site-de-rencontre&603=e6 TITL: What advice would you give to anyone looking to follow in your footsteps and aim for a career such as yours? What three things would you say they need in order to get their foot in the door?

KW: You have to be strong enough and confident enough to really be yourself and should try to enjoy every step of the journey to realizing your dreams. Everyone’s experiences and encounters will ultimately be useful. Life is like a circle! Now you might see your experiences and encounters like many dots, but in the near future these dots will be dot-line and then will be continuous line!

Three things are 1.) Really get to know yourself well – meaning know your strong points (what you are best at) and also your weak points. 2.) Don’t be afraid to take chances, but be well prepared to take chances since you don’t know when they come 3.) Building trusting relationships with people you would like to work

TITL: Finally then, where do you see the future of broadcasting going in the years to come, and what would you most like to see the industry take on board/bring to fruition for both those in the industry and TV/film fans?

KW: One thing that never changes is that “great content” has staying power. It will live on forever. The only thing that will change is how it is consumed – from a big screen to a small watch. Talented PEOPLE have, and will be, the key to the creation of great content. AI cannot create content with the warmth of people. We have to keep creating great content but consider which type of content to fit which type of media.

For more information on WOWOW, visit the website.

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EMMERDALE ANNOUNCE FIRST TRANSGENDER CHARACTER 0 58

Emmerdale has cast the soap’s first transgender character as Moira Dingle will recognise an intruder at Butler’s Farm as her daughter Hannah Barton – who has since become Matty.

Thinking that the farm has been broken into, Cain punches and knocks out Matty Barton mistaking him for an intruder. However, when Moira arrives she instantly recognises him as her daughter Hannah.

Matty will be played by Ash Palmisciano who has already begun filming with the show. Ash who has previously appeared in ‘Boy Meets Girl’ and ‘Mum’ will appear on screen at the end of the month.

“Matty is a man trying to shake off his past and find acceptance in the present,” says Emmerdale producer Kate Brookes. “His story is full of emotion, humour and ultimately hope as he settles back into rural village life, reconnecting with old friends and forging new relationships along the way.

“The character certainly knows how to make an impact: cheeky, effervescent, quick-witted and headstrong, and it’s not long before he’s charmed his way into the affections of all those who meet him.”

Speaking about his new role, Palmisciano says: “I’m very excited to be joining the very welcoming Emmerdale family. From nervous auditions to now working alongside the team daily has been truly amazing. Matty’s a groundbreaking character to play and I can’t wait to see what’s ahead for him.”

Previously played by Grace Cassidy between 2009 and 2012, Matty left the village for a fresh start in London.

JANGO FLASH CHATS “PERSEID 45”, SOCIAL MEDIA & ULTIMATE AMBITIONS 0 106

With his “kamikaze pop” sound already having caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, Jack Angus Golightly, AKA Jango Flash, is slowly but surely making a name for himself, and his latest single “Perseid 45” is sure to have more music fans and critics alike talking. ThisIsTheLatest caught up with Jango to talk song-writing inspiration and his big plans for the future.

TITL: Please introduce yourself if you would.

Jango Flash: Hi my names Jack, AKA “Tasty Daniels”, AKA “Ooo what’s in dem briefs”, AKA “Jango Flash”.

TITL: Where did the name Jango Flash come from?

JF: It was two nicknames which I ended up gluing together. All of my close friends call me “Jango” because it kinda acts as an Abbreviation of (J)ack (An)gus (Go)lightly, and when I worked in a kitchen, I used to get called “Flash” because of how fast I could chop onions. I feel like every artist at some stage has made a list of “cool” sounding words to put together, like I did. But I ended up hating the process of deciding on something that felt concrete, because it was always so over analysed and contrived. I guess that’s why some people have went back to using online generators for sourcing a name without much thought, or just adding 5 more letters in or around a word. If you’re looking for a good name, it’s usually right on your doorstep.

TITL: What would you say your artist unique selling point is?

JF: That’s a tricky one, I never really think about USP’s in music but I guess it would have to be my hands, apparently I’ve got lucky thumbs.

TITL: Which three artists or bands would you say you’ve been and are most influenced/inspired by? What impact do they have on the music you make?

JF: Damn, that’s tough. Subconsciously I guess I’m inspired by early 2000’s music like t.A.T.u. because they came about at a really weird time in my life. I remember seeing the music video for “All The Things She Said” on Kerrang! and just feeling so many different emotions. They have this wonderful ability of being able to take darker, guitar driven music and then re-purpose it in a huge girl band style, it’s bad ass! I think there’s something to be said about their influences and how they decided to express that in their music. Death Grips are another group I love. From the get go, they’ve had an entire fan-base in the palm of their hands because they are masters at toying with peoples expectations. They’ve got a powerful presence on and off stage, and I can admire that they still do everything them selves, they are essentially modern day punks. Them Things is the band I play drums in, and I’m influenced by everything that we do together. Everyone in Them Things is full of fire and we’re all pretty free thinkers. We’ve fought badly with each other in the past and equally seen each other through a lot as friends, so I find it hard to imagine not being with those guys.

TITL: Is there a story behind your latest single “Perseid 45” and is there an EP or album in the works?

JF: I’ll have a fully illustrated, four track E.P finished by the end of July time. I have a second single ready to release in June called “Deeper Thrill”, and two music videos in the works. The story behind “Perseid 45” came from a time when me and my partner took some duvets and deck chairs out into a field in Edinburgh and watched the Perseid meteor shower. I found it so strange to see that many in one night, it was pure magic. We had gone through a really rough time together when I wrote this song and I guess that was the first thing I thought about. It’s a blown out projection of extra terrestrial pondering, experiences shared and dark feelings of existentialism brought on by losing someone who you may have took for granted.

TITL: When it comes to song-writing, where or how would you say you most find your inspiration?

JF: Inspiration usually strikes me at the worst times, it sucks. I’ll be on public transport with a melody rattling around my head and I’ll have to pull out my phone to record it, but somehow play down looking like a fruit loop by casually whistling to myself. Sometimes it’s circumstantial, like I woke up one morning and my partner was humming something, so I was like “what is that” and she went “oh, it’s chamber of reflection by Mac Demarco” and I say “nah it’s not, it sounds nothing like that”. I loved it so much that I ran downstairs to record it and it ended up being the guitar hook in “Perseid 45.” In terms of writing lyrics, I write a hell of a lot… like every day. When my first MacBook broke I lost around 600 notes full of stories, lyrics, poems and ideas. I just keep writing down my thoughts until I’ve struck something that makes me feel good, or accurately conveys a particular emotion. Other times I’ll highlight a phrase that sticks out to me in a sentence. Maybe the person talking is a character I can live through for a while, and they can be the ones writing. I try and pay attention to oddities that throw me off kilter.

TITL: Which song, by another band or artist, do you wish you could have written, and why?

I’m sure I thought about this again last month, and it would probably be Carol King ‘s “Too Late.” Every time it comes on I just well up, because in it’s essence it’s so full of warmth and forgiveness, whilst ultimately saying “well I guess this is us then, bye”. It’s totally heart breaking in the best of ways, and it’s got to be one of my favourite songs in the world.

TITL: Are there any tour or performance plans you can tell me about? 

JF: I don’t actually have a band together yet, it’s all just me at the minute. I have a few close friends on standby who are whole-heartedly ready to play with me should I be called for duty. Hopefully this year I can play my first show, but for now I want to create a body of work I can be proud of.

TITL: Which venue in the world would you most like to play and which four bands or artists, living or dead, would you like to share the bill with? 

JF: Jesus. I’m not really au fait with venues, I’ve never been a big dreamer on where it is I’d like to play, I’m always just happy playing live in general. I’ve always been more into dive bars though, they seem to have more character than academies etc which usually feel like glorified sports halls with overpriced drinks. If I were to choose though, it would have been CBGB’s when that was still around. I watched a documentary all about that place, it’s a great shame that somewhere with such colourful history got shut down. As for the acts – The Doors, Trash Talk, Timber Timbre and Babylon Zoo. I’m ready to hire in for parties.

TITL: As someone who’s already caught the attention of BBC Introducing and BBC 6 Music, do you pay much attention to what the media says/writes about you, or are you more concerned with what your fans think? 

JF: I haven’t really had much written press until now with blogs starting to show interest in my work, plus my fans are still very much local at the moment. The thing I care about the most is how all of it is represented, I feel strongly about my work and it’s the only thing I really care about right now besides Them Things, my partner, my friends and my family. If those people are enjoying my music right now, I’m happy.

TITL: As a modern day artist in a technology obsessed world, how do you feel about the power the likes of Twitter and other sites can and do have in terms of helping an artist grow their fan-base and keep themselves current? Have you found using social media to be a help or a hindrance when it comes to your career?

JF: I think on the DL I don’t like the fact that artists almost have to use social media if they want to be counted. At the same time though I don’t see it doing any harm because it’s helping people to connect with one another in creative ways. Not to sound all TED X about it, but I think we’re going to see a lot of expansion on the platforms we’re using, and that will bring in new and exciting ways to promote content, so that excites me. As much as I’d sometimes love to scrap social media, I’m still guilty of sitting up and scrolling through spicy ass memes. If you want to make money in today’s world, here’s a tip… create top quality original memes, watermark them and build an empire, THEN become a musician.

TITL: Finally then, what’s your ultimate goal? What would you like people to remember you for in terms of your music and what would you like your legacy to be? 

JF: I have far too many crazy goals, but I’m trying to take this project one step at a time. I’d love to have my own podcast, direct videos, produce music for film and TV and write my own screenplays. Right now though the wheels are in motion, I’m happy making my own music and seeing where it takes me, I just need to keep pushing myself out of my comfort zone.

Check out “Perseid 45” below and for more information on Jango Flash, give his page a like on Facebook or follow him on Twitter. You can also see Jango Flash live on June 8th in Newcastle, as support for Ty Segal & The Freedom Band.