LIVE: FALL OUT BOY PLUS GUESTS: MANCHESTER PHONES4U ARENA 17/03/14 0 183

New Politics of Copenhagen, Denmark open the show, performing to an arena that isn’t even half full. Despite this, introducing themselves with a succession of hand claps, none of which were repeated or joined in with by the eager few hundred on the floor before them, the trio do their best to be as energetic and as entertaining as they could.  With their album due for an imminent release, the short set, receives at most, a lukewarm reception, with ‘Just Like Me’ proving to be a highlight. The sight of seeing vocalist David Boyd perform a breakdancing routine half way through is random and completely unnecessary; a pointless exercise perhaps designed to pass some time.

Taylor Momsen, eager and excited about the band’s album release today, stands centre stage as an array of white lights flash brightly enough to make her audience see spots. The Pretty Reckless, launching into ‘Follow Me Down’ instigate a hand clap and the venue, which with every minute that passes is slowly reaching capacity, echoes with the responses of the crowd. The stage lighting makes it hard for anyone at a distance to capture a suitable photo of Taylor, her blonde hair often hiding much of her face but as the set continues, fan favourite ‘Make Me Wanna Die’ has the masses abandoning their cameras and phones to, metaphorically at least, lose their minds. On the downside, the blackouts at the end of each song, combined with Taylor starting almost every sentence she speaks with the word ‘Manchester’ – as if the thousands before her didn’t know where they were already – are just irritating, and as good as their performance is, it can’t be said that it’s great.

By the time Fall Out Boy, riding a wave of almost unparalleled success since their return little over a year ago, take to the stage, less than 50 seats remain unoccupied and the floor is a sea of bodies, inching their way as close to the front as they can. Wearing masks through opening number ‘The Phoenix’, the masses before them, many of whom grew up listening to the band a decade ago, are instantly transported back to their teenage years, while older members of the audience cannot help but join in the throng of people jumping, cheering and clapping beside them. A power problem after the third song would probably have most bands in an absolute panic – but not these guys. Instead, as technicians work quickly to rectify the situation, Pete snaps a photo on his phone while Patrick sits centre stage and pretends to strum on his guitar.

With power restored, ‘This Ain’t A Scene’ sees thousands upon thousands of people throwing their arms back and forth as they sing along with the chorus, and a Mexican wave soon after has every seated attendee on their feet. Perhaps taking a leaf out of the 30 Seconds To Mars playbook, a number of black balloons appear above the heads of those on the floor, being pushed and punched their way around the vast space. They are a little irritating, but as a number are soon popped and discarded, no one seems particularly bothered by them.

A short acoustic set, performed towards the back of the venue, provides everyone with their first and only real opportunity to get their breath back and, after Patrick declares ‘This feels like we’re on a camp-out’, ‘Grand Theft Auto/Where Is Your Boy’ is lapped up, cameras and phones held aloft to record it.

Back on the main stage mere minutes later and with the show drawing to an end, at the request of the band, the lights are dimmed, camera phones are held up high and the arena is transformed into a glittering sea of white and silver for ‘Just One Yesterday’. Prior to a break in the set, thousands of arms are then thrust back and forward once again, voices reverberating everywhere as ‘My Songs Know What You Did In The Dark’ plays out.

A few minutes later, Patrick, now lit under a spotlight at the top of the staging area, plays the keys as an introduction to final three numbers in the set. ‘Save Rock ‘n’ Roll’ sees a montage of famous faces including Kurt Cobain and Michael Jackson being displayed on the big screen, while post the now regular band Twitter pic taken from the stage, ‘Thanks For The Mmrs’ is the true final chance for everyone present to completely let themselves go, which they do, arms everywhere, groups of individuals lifting one another onto their shoulders.

Despite the likelihood of leaving thousands with repetitive strain injury to their arms, the band exit the stage to rapturous cheers and applause while the thoroughly entertained crowd before them linger within the arena, longing to hold on to the visions and memories of tonight for as long as they can. 

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GRAHAM NORTON & ALAN CARR CONFIRMED AS JUDGES ON RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE UK 0 89

BBC Three has confirmed two of TV’s best loved presenters and personalities, Graham Norton and Alan Carr, will be joining RuPaul and Michelle Visage on the judging panel for RuPaul’s Drag Race UK.

Eight-time Bafta TV award-winner Graham Norton is no stranger to RuPaul’s Drag Race, having already appeared on RuPaul’s Drag Race: All Stars season two in the US as a guest judge in 2016. Whilst comedian Alan Carr is a long-time fan of RuPaul, having made his acquaintance when Ru appeared on his chat show Alan Carr’s Chatty Man.

Both Graham and Alan share a passion for the drag scene and RuPaul’s Drag Race.

The first UK adaption of the global hit will showcase the most fabulous drag queens that the UK has to offer, and Graham and Alan will appear as rotating resident judges. Each week, they will join RuPaul, Michelle Visage and a celebrity guest judge.

For the grand finale, Graham and Alan will both appear on the judging panel alongside previously announced judge Michelle Visage, where together they will assist host RuPaul in crowning the UK’s Next Drag Superstar.

Graham Norton says: “Becoming part of the drag race family makes me ridiculously happy! I can’t wait to see what the UK drag queens bring to the party, but they better weeeeerk!!!”

Alan Carr, says: “Wow! To be sat next to Michelle Visage and Mama Ru as a guest judge on possibly one of my all-time favourite shows EVER is a dream come true. I can’t wait to see what the UK Queens have got in store – it’s going to be sickening! *does death drop*”

RuPaul, says: “I was both shocked and delighted when Graham and Alan told me they’d be wearing tucking panties when sitting at the judges’ table. I told them it was not necessary, but they insisted. Now that’s what I call dedication!”

Kate Phillips, Controller, Entertainment Commissioning, says: “I am so excited that self-confessed Drag Race fans Graham and Alan have agreed to join Ru and Michelle on our judging panel. Their immense wit and wisdom will be invaluable in ensuring the most deserving Queen sashays away with the title.”

2019 GRAMMY WINNERS ANNOUNCED 0 84

Dua Lipa, Kacey Musgraves and Childish Gambino were among the big winners at this year’s Grammy Awards.

Country-pop star Musgraves took home four prizes in total, including Album of the Year for Golden Hour. The singer-songwriter, who bagged the top prize over the likes of Cardi B, Drake and Janelle Monae, thanked her “sweet husband” during her acceptance speech, who she met and fell in love with during the recording of the collection.

Musgraves also picked up awards for Best Country Album, Best Country Solo Performance for Butterflies and Best Country Song for Space Cowboy. Golden Hour is the singer’s first Top 10 on the Official UK Albums Chart, debuting at Number 6 upon its released last April.

Meanwhile, Dua Lipa won Best New Artist and Best Dance Recording for her Silk City collaboration Electricity. The singer thanked her fans, “who have allowed me to be the best version of myself.”

Lipa also paid tribute to the “many female artists” in the category, adding: “I guess this year we’ve really stepped up”. The comment was a not-so-subtle dig at Grammys president Neil Portnow, who last year brushed off criticism of the lack of female winners by saying women needed to “step up” in order to be considered.

Elsewhere, Childish Gambino won Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Music Video of the Year for This Is America, and Lady Gaga picked up prizes for Best Pop Solo Performance and Best Pop Duo Performance, the latter for Bradley Cooper duet Shallow from A Star Is Born.

Here are the winners and nominees from the 2019 Grammy Awards:
Album Of The Year — Golden Hour, Kacey Musgraves
Record Of The Year — “This Is America,” Childish Gambino
Best New Artist — Dua Lipa
Best Rap Album — Invasion Of Privacy, Cardi B
Best R&B Album — H.E.R., H.E.R.
Best Rap Song — “God’s Plan,” Drake
Best Country Album — Golden Hour, Kacey Musgraves
Song Of The Year — “This Is America,” Childish Gambino
Best Pop Duo/Group Performance — “Shallow,” Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper
Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical — Pharrell Williams
Best Rap/Sung Performance — “This Is America,” Childish Gambino
Best Rap Performance — King’s Dead, Kendrick Lamar, Jay Rock, Future & James Blake / Bubblin, Anderson .Paak
Best Rock Album — From The Fires, Greta Van Fleet
Best Rock Song — “Masseduction” St. Vincent
Best Metal Performance — Electric Messiah, High On Fire
Best Rock Performance — When Bad Does Good, Chris Cornell
Best Urban Contemporary Album — Everything Is Love, The Carters
Best R&B Song — “Boo’d Up,” Ella Mai
Best Traditional R&B Performance — Bet Ain’t Worth The Hand, Leon Bridges / How Deep Is Your Love, Pj Morton Featuring Yebba
Best R&B Performance — Best Part H.E.R. Featuring Daniel Caesar
Best Latin Jazz Album — Back To The Sunset, Dafnis Prieto Big Band
Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album — American Dreamers: Voices Of Hope, Music Of Freedom, John Daversa Big Band Featuring Daca Artists
Best Jazz Instrumental Album — Emanon, The Wayne Shorter Quartet
Best Jazz Vocal Album — The Window, Cécile Mclorin Salvant
Best Improvised Jazz Solo — Don’t Fence Me In, John Daversa
Best Reggae Album — 44/876, Sting & Shaggy
Best Dance/Electronic Album — Woman Worldwide, Justice
Best Dance Recording — Electricity, Silk City & Dua Lipa Featuring Diplo & Mark Ronson
Best Contemporary Classical Composition — Kernis: Violin Concerto, James Ehnes, Ludovic Morlot & Seattle Symphony
Best Classical Compendium — Fuchs: Piano Concerto ‘Spiritualist’; Poems Of Life; Glacier; Rush, Joann Falletta
Best Classical Solo Vocal Album — Songs Of Orpheus – Monteverdi, Caccini, D’india & Landi, Karim Sulayman
Best Classical Instrumental Solo — Kernis: Violin Concerto, James Ehnes
Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance — Anderson, Laurie: Landfall, Laurie Anderson & Kronos Quartet
Best Choral Performance — Mcloskey: Zealot Canticles, Donald Nally
Best Opera Recording — Bates: The (R)Evolution Of Steve Jobs, Michael Christie, Garrett Sorenson, Wei Wu, Sasha Cooke, Edward Parks & Jessica E. Jones
Best Orchestral Performance — Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11, Andris Nelsons
Producer Of The Year, Classical — Blanton Alspaugh
Best Engineered Album, Classical — Shostakovich: Symphonies Nos. 4 & 11, Andris Nelsons & Boston Symphony Orchestra
Best Pop Vocal Album — Sweetener, Ariana Grande
Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album — My Way, Willie Nelson
Best Pop Solo Performance — Joanne (Where Do You Think You’re Goin’?), Lady Gaga
Best Country Song — “Space Cowboy,” Kacey Musgraves
Best Country Duo/Group Performance — Tequila, Dan + Shay
Best Country Solo Performance — “Butterflies,” Kacey Musgraves
Best Music Film — Quincy, Quincy Jones
Best Music Video — “This Is America,” Childish Gambino
Best Regional Roots Music Album — No ‘Ane’I, Kalani Pe’a
Best Tropical Latin Album — Anniversary, Spanish Harlem Orchestra
Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano) — ¡México Por Siempre!, Luis Miguel
Best Latin Rock, Urban Or Alternative Album — Aztlán, Zoé
Best Latin Pop Album — Sincera, Claudia Brant
Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling) — Faith – A Journey For All, Jimmy Carter
Best Children’s Album — All The Sounds, Lucy Kalantari & The Jazz Cats
Best Folk Album — All Ashore, Punch Brothers
Best Contemporary Blues Album — Please Don’t Be Dead, Fantastic Negrito
Best Traditional Blues Album — The Blues Is Alive And Well, Buddy Guy
Best Bluegrass Album — The Travelin’ Mccourys, The Travelin’ Mccourys
Best Americana Album — By The Way, I Forgive You, Brandi Carlile
Best American Roots Song — The Joke, Brandi Carlile
Best American Roots Performance — The Joke, Brandi Carlile
Best New Age Album — Opium Moon, Opium Moon
Best Song Written For Visual Media — “Shallow,” Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper
Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media — Black Panther, Ludwig Göransson
Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media — The Greatest Showman, Hugh Jackman (& Various Artists)
Best World Music Album — Freedom, Soweto Gospel Choir
Best Roots Gospel Album — Unexpected, Jason Crabb
Best Contemporary Christian Music Album — Look Up Child, Lauren Daigle
Best Gospel Album — Hiding Place, Tori Kelly
Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song — “You Say,” Lauren Daigle
Best Gospel Performance/Song — “Never Alone,” Tori Kelly Featuring Kirk Franklin
Best Contemporary Instrumental Album — Steve Gadd Band, Steve Gadd Band
Best Immersive Audio Album — Eye In The Sky – 35th Anniversary Edition, The Alan Parsons Project
Best Remixed Recording — “Walking Away (Mura Masa Remix),” Haim
Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical — Colors, Beck
Best Historical Album — Voices Of Mississippi: Artists And Musicians Documented By William Ferris
Best Album Notes — Voices Of Mississippi: Artists And Musicians Documented By William Ferris
Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package — Squeeze Box: The Complete Works Of “Weird Al” Yankovic, Weird Al Yankovic
Best Recording Package — Masseduction, St. Vincent
Best Arrangement, Instruments And Vocals — “Spiderman Theme,” Randy Waldman Featuring Take 6 & Chris Potter
Best Arrangement, Instrumental Or A Cappella — “Stars And Stripes Forever,” John Daversa Big Band Featuring Daca Artists
Best Instrumental Composition — Blut Und Boden (Blood And Soil), Terence Blanchard
Best Alternative Music Album — “Colors,” Beck
Best Musical Theater Album — The Band’s Visit, Original Broadway Cast
Best Comedy Album — Equanimity & The Bird Revelation, Dave Chappelle