The Flintstones Are Back From Big Screen Extinction 0 336

Yabba-Dabba-Doo! Warner Bros. Animation is hoping to bring The Flintstones back from extinction in the form of a full-length animated feature film! 

 

As reported today in The Hollywood Reporter, the studio has hired ‘The Campaign‘ scribe Chris Henchy of Will Ferrell and Adam McKay’s Gary Sanchez productions to pen the script.

The original series, which ran for 6 seasons, is set in the prehistoric town of Bedrock and was a humorous take on the “modern stone-age family” in classic sitcom style that followed the antics of average working class husband Fred Flintstone, his wife Wilma, daughter Pebbles, best friend Barney, Barney’s wife Betty and their son Bamm-Bamm.

The series has of course received the big screen treatment before, first in 1994 with the critically panned live-action The Flintstones from Universal Pictures and then again in 2000 with the direct to home video The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas.

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Warner Bros. acquired the rights to “The Flintstones” from Universal back in 1996 as part of Time Warner’s acquisition of Turner Broadcasting.

The series has seen numerous returns to television and most recently was in the works to return to television under Family Guy and American Dad creator Seth McFarlanes creative prowess, but the project was shelved.

Although the film has not yet been given a release date, Warner Bros. is aiming for a 2017-2018 release.

Warner Bros. Animation is also responsible for 2014’s hit The Lego Movie which has thus far drawn in more than $457 million at the worldwide box office.

 

 

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ANDREA EVANS TALKS ‘ROCKING THE COUCH’ & UPCOMING PROJECTS 0 178

Having been in the entertainment business since she was 10 years old, Andrea Evans is no stranger to the highs and lows of Hollywood, but the events of recent years involving the likes of Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby and the ever growing #MeToo movement have now seen her add another bow to her already impressive resume, as a producer of the new documentary Rocking The Couch. The documentary features interviews with many victims of Hollywood sexual assault, as well as several individuals who were involved in the Wallace Kaye case of 1992 and takes a long hard look at the cases both past and present and the valuable lessons that, for the most part, still haven’t been learnt. With the documentary proving to be a huge success, ThisIsTheLatest spoke to Andrea about why she got involved, whether she might one day move into directing and where and when fans can see her on screen next.

TITL: Rocking The Couch is largely fuelled firstly by the case, led by twelve women who were brave enough to speak out, brought against Wallace Kaye in 1992. For anyone who is unaware of the story, could you sum it up for me and explain ultimately how it’s impacted this documentary?

Andrea Evans: A lot of documentaries tend to follow their own path and that’s exactly what happened with this one. My co-executive producer, friend and director Minh Collins and I were first only going to interview people from the past few years or thereabouts and build the documentary around that, but then my husband brought to my attention the case brought against Wallace Kaye, as you say, in 1992, in Hollywood. The fact he had to bring this to my attention is kind of the whole point – I was an actress, living in Hollywood in the 1990’s and I’d never heard this story, or anything to do with it. The story itself is led by 12 young, aspiring actresses, interviewing with a talent agent at the time who then sexually assaulted each of them. They went to their unions to complain, the unions told them to forget about it and then finally, one of the actresses, who wasn’t with a union, called the police who got involved, and these women took him to court and won.

You would think that that would make news, and that there would be a lot of attention about it, but there never was. When I started interviewing people about the case, they were shocked because I was the first person who had ever contacted them. That became sort of the main feature, the meat of the documentary was this case – how did it happen and why, and also why didn’t we hear anything about it.

TITL: As an actress yourself, is the behaviour and attitudes towards women addressed in Rocking The Couch something you’ve experienced yourself or is it something you just feel passionate about enough to have done something to help stand against it and spread the word?

AE: I think pretty much every actress in Hollywood – and a lot of actors too – we don’t want to leave men out of this, I think it’s a very big issue with and for them as well, particularly with gay men – but yes, we all have stories. My stories, thank goodness, were not as traumatic as some of the stories we feature in the documentary. We did interview me, as well, as one of the subjects, but my stories were not that good in comparison to other people’s so I had to put myself on the cutting room floor – something that I never thought I would actually do, or say I’ve done. We also bring up the fact that, I think we have some interviews with Carrie Mitchum, the grand-daughter of the famous actor Robert Mitchum, where she discusses how we all knew this was going on and that’s true – we all did. If you heard from celebrities who said they were blind-sided or didn’t know about it, they’re lying, because we all knew, and we all saw it. It was definitely something that needed to come out into the light, needed to be addressed and needs to stop.

TITL: Exactly how shocked are you that lessons weren’t, and, as proven by the scores of recent cases made against a number of men in the industry, haven’t been learned in the more than two decades that have passed since the Kaye case?

AE: I think society is changing and that’s why you and I are having this conversation. I think the way society looks at sexual abuse and sexual assault, certainly in the workplace, is changing. And maybe social media has something to do with this, but I think as a society, we are now finally starting to actually pay attention to the victims, to listen to what they are saying. You’re a woman and I’m sure you’ve heard these things before, you know ‘dress appropriately’ ‘You don’t wanna do this…’ It shouldn’t be the way that a woman dresses that makes her the victim of a crime. But yet, so many women, who have been a victim of these crimes, are accused are bringing said crime upon themselves, because there’s something in or about their behaviour, and I think as a society we’re finally looking at that, paying attention to what happened to these women.

My favourite instance I bring up about how society, in more recent times, is how we look at all these instances in the Catholic church. Priests have been accused of abusing young boys, and we never asked these young boys the sort of things that have been asked of women over the years – we took them at their word. Why wasn’t that the case with the women who spoke out? Why weren’t they taken at their word, for all these decades? That’s the more interesting question.

TITL: You’ve said in the past that this documentary presents a “realistic view of what happened” and that it includes “things that (you don’t think) the mainstream media did.” What exactly do you mean by that?

AE: Certainly when we were bringing to light the Weinstein case, I don’t think the mainstream media paid much attention to the struggle undertaken by actresses – and actors – trying to get into the business, and that, to my mind, is where most of the abuse happened. Abuse often happens to the most vulnerable, and because there’s no real path towards becoming an actor or actress, much like becoming a lawyer or doctor, there have been a lot of people who’ve taken advantage of that – people anxious to get their foot in the door of the industry. They’re eager and anxious…and that’s where and when the majority of these people end up in trouble.

It’s easier to get a film about A-List celebrities who are being abused or to get that on the evening news, because we all like to hear about celebrities, but that’s not the case for the majority of these cases. They’re people who are just trying to get into the industry.

TITL: If for instance, the #MeToo movement hadn’t started up and women hasn’t started speaking up, do you think you’d have still made this documentary and released it, or is it something you were ultimately spurred on to do as a result of the outpouring of outrage that came with the accusations and cases made against the likes of Harvey Weinstein and Bill Cosby?

AE: I would love to think that I would’ve made this movie anyway because I do feel strongly about this issue, but I also know that when the Weinstein and Cosby cases first came to light, my partner and I were just having coffee and got to thinking about how someone should really look into this, and could make a great documentary out of it, and we sort of looked at one another and both had the same idea – ‘Why not us? Let’s do this.’

I was inspired by the #MeToo movement and driven to tell what we feel is the true story, and to try and show it from several different angles, including Carrie Mitchum’s remarks that we all saw it. I saw instances in my working career of women that were being approached and maybe took producers up on their approach – I certainly saw that – and said nothing, as did many people. I’m glad now that we can get it out in the open and tell what’s really been happening.

TITL: You co-produced this documentary with your director from The Hit List Minh Collins and Jerry Sommer. What would you say you each brought, in creative terms, to the documentary?

AE: Minh was the director and obviously, having directed before, he was able to pull it all together and put into the shape it is now. Jerry did a lot of the filming as well and the editing. I know from my own part, that it was extremely important to have a woman on board and I went to every interview, even if I wasn’t asking the questions – I wanted to be there to show my support for every single woman, and so that she would feel more comfortable and know that there was someone there who would understand her point of view. They were being brave enough to tell their story and I just wanted to be there to help, in any way I could, to make telling that a little easier for them.

I also sought out a lot of the people you saw and see on the air – I was the one that got in touch with them, and I don’t want to say ‘convinced’ because a lot of the people that came forward, even the people on the Wallace Kaye case – the lawyers, the victims, the very brave policewoman who went in, knowing she would probably be assaulted, but wanted to be there for those women and without her, the case would never have come out – they were all very anxious to tell their story. They wanted the truth to come out and I think it was therapeutic for them. Hopefully, my being a woman helped them with that.

A huge part of why I got involved with this is that I am loaning my celebrity to this movie, in publicising it and trying to get it out there so people pay attention. There are so many good films and documentaries that go completely unnoticed, that don’t get the attention they deserve and that’s a big part of my contribution to this film.

TITL: How has the reaction been to the film so far and, what do you most want those who see it to take away/learn from it?

AE: I have been thrilled with the reaction. Here in the States, it’s been really big – it keeps growing and growing. We’re now being distributed, with Amazon, to pretty much every country that speaks English, and the interest in the UK has been steadily growing as well, which I am very happy and pleased to see. It’s very gratifying – I’ve never been a producer really, I’ve never had this experience of creating something from the very beginning and taking it out to audience and getting their response. I hope the viewers in the UK will check it out, look at it and see our work and let us know what they think. Amazon has been so happy we’re now talking about an addition documentary, so any comments people have, any ideas, I would love to hear them.

TITL: Is there anything you can tell me about this potential second documentary or are you still sketching out ideas etc. for now?

AE: We’re still sketching out the ideas for it, so I can’t really tell you anything about it, but I would love to talk to you about it when it is released. I’m so thrilled that I’m even able to talk about it and that this one has been so successful – that kind of blows my mind, having been a first time producer in particular.

TITL: Looking to the future, do you think the likes of the #MeToo movement can, as we’ve seen make an impact, but one big enough to actually eradicate the sort of behaviour that the documentary focusses on? What more can and needs to be done to ensure incidents like those so many women have spoken out about in recent months never happen again and that those who are actively involved in such are punished in a suitable way?

AE: We’ve yet to see how big of an impact all this has and that’s gonna take some time. Hopefully our daughters and grand-daughters won’t have to deal with this kind of subject, which brings to mind another reason and part as to why we did the documentary. My daughter happened to be on break from school when we were fifteen and she wanted to come to the set. I was a little wary about that – she is not quite fifteen – and I wondered whether or not I wanted her to hear these stories. She wants to go into the entertainment industry so I thought ‘yeah, she should hear these stories’, because the really only true way to prevent these kinds of situations is to truly do everything in your own power to prevent it. Even if the #MeToo movement has a HUGE amount of success, even if it reduces these sorts of problems by 90%, there will still be that 10% where things happen. So the best way for people to eliminate it is to protect themselves and I hope that men and women who want to go into the entertainment industry will watch this documentary and use it as a bit of a cautionary tale. My daughter said she learned a huge amount from watching it, like how to minimise your risk by doing things like not going out for drinks with someone who’s trying to help you break into the industry. Minimise the risk as much as possible, and hopefully that will help that 10% I referred to earlier.

TITL: Where do you go from here then? Do you maybe want to move into the directors’ chair next time or are you happy where you are, producing and giving your name and status to a cause or a film you’re passionate about and eager to help get the word out about?

AE: I really enjoyed the producing. At some point yes, I would love to try my hand at directing and might have a little go during the next documentary just to see how I get on, but my main bread and butter is my acting career. I love it and I love the industry – it pains me to have to do documentaries about such a negative aspect of a business that I’ve been in since I was 10 years old, and that has been very good to me – so hopefully I can help it, and help maintain some of the integrity of this business in my own little way because I really do love it.

TITL: Finally then, in terms of your acting career, have you got any projects in the pipeline you can tell me about?

AE: I don’t know what airs in the UK, and that’s a problem, but I am in series available on Amazon Prime called The Bay – which is so much fun to do. I’m working with a lot of people I’ve worked with before in other situations, and I just came on in season four as a real troublemaker and I believe I will be making a lot of trouble in season 5 which will air next year. People can watch me there.

Rocking The Couch is via all VOD platforms including Amazon and Vimeo now. To keep up to date with Andrea Evans, follow her on Twitter.

SHARON BLYNN CHATS ‘CAPTAIN MARVEL’, ‘BALD IS BEAUTIFUL’ & HER ADVICE FOR ASPIRING ACTORS 0 267

Currently on screen in the latest Marvel blockbuster Captain Marvel alongside Brie Larson, Sharon Blynn has an impressive resume of work to her name having appeared in several hit TV shows and movies. As an individual who has fought and beaten ovarian cancer, she’s also the founder of Bald Is Beautiful, an organisation which supports ovarian cancer programs and raises awareness. With a number of projects “in development”, ThisIsTheLatest spoke to Blynn about her fond memories of her time on the CM set, the one role she’s the most proud of and what the future has in store.

TITL: Prior to becoming an actress, did you ever have any other career plans or ambitions? 

Sharon Blynn: Before I started Bald Is Beautiful and pursuing acting and modeling. I worked at a record company in NYC, specifically in jazz. My dream at the time was to eventually have my own record company or do artist development (Berry Gordy-style) to help bring gifted artists to the world. I spent many years collaborating with incredibly talented artists, forging lasting friendships, and hanging out in the legendary New York City jazz scene into the wee hours every night! Soon after leaving the music biz, I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer and that journey inspired me to create my Bald Is Beautiful movement, which encompasses ovarian cancer awareness advocacy, motivational speaking and community outreach, as well as acting.

TITL: What is it about acting and performing that you love so much? Now that you’re a well-established actress, could you ever envisage yourself doing anything else? 

SB: Ironically, before my cancer journey and starting Bald Is Beautiful, I could never have imagined that I would first of all remain bald much less become an actor! What I love about performing is what I love about LIFE — digging into emotion, honest self-reflection, connecting to another person, listening to people share their stories and holding space for them to feel safe doing so, telling stories that cultivate empathy and understanding, and expand our perspective about people and the world around us. Before I began acting, it terrified me, frankly, but I very quickly caught the “acting bug” from my first time performing on stage in a very special interactive, immersive theatrical show called Off the Muff (conceived, produced, and directed by my twin sis Elisa), and have found a true passion for it. Bald Is Beautiful is still the fuel behind my acting fire, so what I do in terms of acting always goes beyond performing and delves into passionate (and compassionate) activism and advocacy.

TITL: You have a varied resume of roles that span several genres including drama and comedy, and have appeared in ShamelessBody of Proof, and Lie to Me along with many other shows. How important to you is it that you’re able to take on a wide variety of roles and genre styles in the work you do, and is there one you prefer over the other? 

SB: I thoroughly enjoy exploring characters in a wide variety of roles and styles, because in the end. It comes down to telling story from an authentic and grounded place. Working across genres and styles also gives me the opportunity to explore different parts of myself, and I love digging into all of those rich emotional layers. I can be a complete goofball and also a sensitive and intense woman, and I can draw from all of that for every kind of role.

TITL: Which of your past performances/roles might you say you’re most proud of and why?

SB: One of my favorite roles was a 12-minute one-woman performance piece I wrote and presented called “How Are We Feeling Today?” I originally wrote it as part of an event called “The Big C”, for which all of the featured performers were cancer survivors sharing their stories through this artistic avenue. This was the first time I’d made a scripted-sculpted representation of the full emotional arc of my ovarian cancer experience, and the director I was paired with helped shape my story into a unique expression that I would like to someday develop into a full one-woman show.

TITL: If you could appear in any other TV show past or present, which would it be and what kind of character would you like to play?

SB: This is such a tough question! There are so many shows of all genres that I have loved watching throughout my life — the first thing that actually popped into my head was to be the guest star – aka the killer – on an episode of Columbo, especially one of the longer-form 90-minute or 2-hour episodes! I think that’s because I just recently happened to catch both the Johnny Cash and Leonard Nimoy appearances in the wee hours of my insomniac cable-surfing! If I’m looking to what’s happening now, I am excited about the bold and compelling stories being told through the limited series or anthology series formats, like Big Little Lies and Sinner or True Detective, and also woman-helmed productions from powerhouses like Shonda Rhimes, Reese Witherspoon, Ava Duvernay, Gina Rodriguez, and others with whom I would love to work. I relish the opportunity to explore a variety of character types, from sensitive and soulful to sinister and dark to quirky and offbeat.

TITL: How did you hear about the audition for the role of Soren in Captain Marvel and did you consider/audition for any other parts? What can you recall of your audition itself? 

SB: The audition for the role of Soren came through my rep, and there was actually very little information provided at that time as far as the project and the character, and even the surrounding storyline. There was no dialogue in the audition scene, all I was given was a couple of sentences generically describing a complex scenario, so I had to create an emotional arc just using that information. It was an exciting challenge to bring a scene like that to life; in some ways more challenging than having lots of dialogue to prepare!

TITL: As a huge fan of Marvel, how does it feel to now be a part of such a huge and globally loved, brand/Universe? 

SB: As an MCU and Stan Lee fan and as an actor, it still feels a bit surreal, and I think I will always be over-the-moon giddy about it. Being in such a special role and compelling scenes, and in particular to be part of a Marvel movie that has its own landmark qualities — first female superhero lead in a Marvel movie, first female director in the MCU — is especially rewarding and meaningful as it relates to my Bald Is Beautiful message to empower women to find and define their strength, courage, beauty, and the womanity of it all!

TITL: Do you have any favorite moments or memories from your time on set that you can share? 

SB: Every moment on set for this shoot is a favorite memory for me! Genuinely! Of course, connecting and working with Ben and Brie in particular was a joy. They both have an ease and warmth that helped make the scenes feel present and relatable. Also, I adored working with Auden and Harriet as my daughter. I’d never worked with children that young who therefore had to shoot in alternating shifts, so working with the two of them was fascinating, both personally – I’m an identical twin myself – and as an actor!

TITL: Captain Marvel is smashing it at the box office on both sides of the Atlantic. Aside from the fact it’s a Marvel film, and has huge support behind it for that reason alone, what do you think it is about this film that fans and critics are loving so much? 

SB: I think the wide appeal of Captain Marvel comes from a few different angles for existing fans and newcomers alike. There is the nostalgia of the ’90s setting, the boldness of the futuristic sci-fi elements, the engaging action sequences and cool visual effects, and the combination of humor and heart. The fierceness and power of the feminine underpinning the movie at its core gives the movie an added layer of appeal not only for female viewers, but also speaks to male viewers – younger and older – in showing how balance and respect help us all rise to our highest potential.

TITL: The film has been championed by many for the way in which it – and Brie Larson’s Carol Danvers – empowers women, reminding them that they are just as strong and capable as any man. Given the recent MeToo movement and all the attention around the way women are treated in the business, just how important and timely do you think the film and this message is? 

SB: The messages of this film have always been important. The timeliness of it comes from the renewed groundswell of momentum and awareness for issues that impact women all over the world, and people are more activated and engaged in the social and political significance of it all. I like to think that the worldwide theatrical release of Captain Marvel occurring on International Women’s Day was both purposeful and magical!

TITL: Away from acting, you founded the organization Bald Is Beautiful after successfully beating ovarian cancer, with the platform helping to raise awareness and support charities and programs. Given that 1 in 2 of us will be affected by cancer in our lifetime, would you like to see more people in the spotlight, and those affected by cancer and other such diseases, speak out in support of those people and organizations working tirelessly to help beat it? What can people do if they want to get involved with Bald Is Beautiful? 

SB: Actually, my acting work began specifically as part of my Bald Is Beautiful organization’s message. It is the visual component of engaging the print, TV, and film industries in expanding how beauty and femininity are depicted. There are many ways to be of support of people and organizations in the cancer trenches, and everyone has their own comfort level with sharing about what is a very private, intimate experience, be it their own or that of a loved one going through cancer treatment. My main hope, then, is that those who do have visibility or are in a position of influence use that platform in whatever ways they feel willing or able.

As far as involvement with Bald Is Beautiful, I always invite people to share my site www.baldisbeautiful.org with anyone for whom they think it can be of comfort, inspiration, resource, encouragement, and hope.

TITL: How do you feel about social media and the impact it can and does have on industries/professions such as yours both personally and professionally? Do you think we as a society are too attached to the likes of Twitter and Facebook or is it simply another tool that for the most part is beneficial to people and projects looking to reach an audience?

SB: As with most technological advancements, there are pros and cons to what those developments bring to our personal or professional lives. It seems to always depend on the users and their intent. Social media can be refreshingly connective, and in some ways it can certainly level the field of play in terms of self-generating and disseminated our art. It can save cost and time, while also eat away at that precious time, because so many people are getting lost in their devices and not engaging with humanity and nature that abounds and surrounds us. It’s vital to have a sense of awareness around both the benefits and potential pitfalls, and be mindful about it all.

TITL: Actors often have very demanding schedules what with filming and press tours etc. How do you unwind after a busy period or hectic filming schedule? 

SB: I cherish spending time with people who are dear to me. I equally appreciate times of quiet solitude to decompress. Exercising is a form of release and reinvigoration that I do often – daily if possible – including the gym, hiking, going for a bike ride or just walking around the neighborhood. I also thoroughly enjoy diving into a Law & Order marathon! I’ve probably seen every episode, most of them more than once, but it doesn’t matter . . . that show, original and SVU, is a sort of mental “soul food” for me.

TITL: Are there any upcoming projects in the pipeline you can tell me about? 

SB: I have a couple of exciting things in development and, in the meantime, continue with the Hollywood hustle of auditioning and “working out” in classes, and enjoying Life!

TITL: What advice would you give to any aspiring actors and actresses out there who are looking to make their way in the industry? Is there any advice you were once given that you would pass on?

SB: I would encourage aspiring actors to understand both the creative and the business side of the industry. Take classes, connect with other actors, do the discipline and work to hone their acting skills. And then . . . live life! One of my acting teachers stressed the importance of living a full life in order to be a full, embodied, and authentic actor and human being. That insight still holds true for me, and I strive to do that in some way every day.

TITL: Finally then, looking to the future, what’s the long-term ambition for you, both personally and professionally?

SB: Professionally speaking, I hope to continue building my acting repertoire and I’m excited about all the possibilities of what’s to come. The same goes for Bald Is Beautiful and reaching more people through this medium of TV and film work or in other ways. Personally, I hope to maintain good health, enjoy my relationships, and overall continue learning and evolving — mentally, emotionally, and spiritually – and experience unconditional joy and love in all areas of life.

Captain Marvel is in cinemas everywhere now. For more information on and to keep up to date with Sharon Blynn, follow her on Twitter. Header photo credit: Alexis Dickey.